Posts Tagged ‘language

03
Jul
12

Takuma Nakahira : “For a Language to Come” (Photography 2)

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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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Published in 1970, “For a Language to Come” is recorded in the history of photography as the first photobook by Takuma Nakahira, the photographer who brought about a turning point in contemporary Japanese photography from the late 1960s to the early 1970s by radically breaking away from the existing image aesthetics at that time. This book consists of one hundred black and white photographs including his work from the legendary photography magazine “Provoke.” However, forty years after the publication of the original book, we have not as yet had the opportunity to examine (and enjoy) his works enough with the exception of a few photographs that has been repeatedly introduced on various occasions (this is particularly true in Europe and the U.S. where the history of contemporary Japanese photography remains less appreciated). Through radical self-critique, Nakahira would repudiate much of this early body of work in his 1973 essay, “Why an Illustrated Botanical Dictionary?” and considered it as something that must be overcome. Yet, for us to reconsider the meaning of the author’s rejection of his inaugural work, it is extremely valuable to know what the works themselves show. Has our history of photography finally caught up with Nakahira? The 2010 republication of “For a Language to Come,” is an attempt to engage Nakahira’s photographic point of departure again in the present, to discover this work as one that is more vibrantly resonant today. [Extract : Osiris Publishing]

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Takuma Nakahira : Shugo Arts

Takuma Nakahira : American Suburb X

Takuma Nakahira : “For a Language to Come” part 1

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02
Jul
12

Takuma Nakahira : ‘For a Language to Come’ (Photography)

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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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Blurred, grainy and out-of-focus was the modus operandi of the Japanese Provoke photographers of the early 1970s, and Takuma Nakahira was the intellectual granddaddy of them all. This reprint of his classic ‘For a Language to Come’ is shot with harsh black and white images printed full bleed across every page and is essential viewing for anybody with an interest in the history of photography. It’s a book of landscapes, urban landscapes where life clings to the shadows and corners of the pictures, where light burns like fire and the only solace is to be found in the underpasses and tunnels of the city that Nakahira portrays. And what a city! It’s an unwelcoming place, a Tokyo where post-war modernisation and political protest have combined to create a world lacking in any warmth or humanity.

Nakahira’s Tokyo is a pre-apocalyptic dead zone. Or perhaps it’s a post-apocalyptic deadzone. It doesn’t really matter because the effect is the same; a place where people lie injured in waiting rooms, where phone lines and power cables suggest an entity that has taken on its own hostile life, where the only means of escape are suggested by the trackways in the road and in the repeated pictures of a cold and turbulent ocean. And that’s the fun part. For a Language to Come also serves as a thesis for Nakahira’s complex forays in the semiotics of visual language and his existentialist idea that photography “consists only in clarifying the fact that material things are things.” A few years after For a Language to Come was published, Takahira wrote that “Extremely grainy images and intentionally unfocussed photographs in particular, have already become mere decoration.” I can think of many examples where that might be true, but Nakahira’s case, it most definitely is not. — Text : Colin Pantall

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Takuma Nakahira : Shugo Arts

Takuma Nakahira : American Suburb X

‘For a Language to Come’ – View Book : Vimeo

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11
May
12

Graham Gillmore : Paintings (Works on Panel)

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‘Sunset Applause’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 60 in
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‘Answers To The Questions To The Answers’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘After You’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘Trash the Planet’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 72 in
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‘Damp Wounds Sorely Mist’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
90 X 72 in
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‘Don’t be so Naive’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘Wash Away Yovr Tears’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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The nature of my project has never been about boiling anything down, but rather exposing the complexities of human experience; particularly one’s self as subject and the world as object. The ‘self’ and the ‘other’ play a pivotal role as subject matter within my manipulations with language – locating, defining and ultimately obscuring any kind of singular ‘meaning’ behind or beneath the surfaces of the world. These games (self imploding sentences, misreadings , backfirings revisions, second thoughts etc.) offer access to the hope for authentic – if flawed – communication while confronting the indeterminacy of language, both literary and abstract. I use these self-conscious devices for a ‘defamiliarizing’ effect. Text allows the work to maintain a narrative thread while maintaining an allegiance to non-figurative imagery. I play the role of scavenger when it comes to the texts I use. I think of these selected fragments as a kind of linguistic ‘road kill’ – skeletons on which to hang the material of the painting. I am engaged with texts that evoke a certain prickliness or an emotional angle that is slightly askew, with an emphasis on themes rooted in an emotional or psychological realm rather than intellect. Sensation overides thought, just as fantasy takes the place of history. Statement

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Graham Gillmore : Monte Clark Gallery

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07
May
12

Janet Jones : ‘Notations’ Series (Collages)

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‘Notations #41’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #7’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #48’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #21’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #37’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #42’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #39’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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“My series is called Notations, and reflects my love of letter forms and typography, of words and language, and a delight in the visual and tactile properties of old books and documents, especially those that are creased, stained and foxed. I’m interested in surface variations and the play of light on shiny areas contrasting with the velvety softness of old papers. In a larger sense, they’re about communication, nuance and layers of meaning. I’ve stencilled some letters in shiny etching ink, occasionally adding metal leaf, and printed letterpress ornaments and a Chinese character. Some papers have been prepared by pouring and splattering India ink. The tiny photographs are my mother at ages 20 months, 3 years, and 25. Other images are from dictionaries and old steel engravings.” ~ JJ

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Janet Jones : Website

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23
Apr
12

Azurebumble : ‘AI : Series’ (Photography Book)

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Recently, I’ve curated a number of image series by photographers from ‘Flickr’ on my blog ‘Aesthetic Investigations’. Subsequently, I thought it would be interesting to document these works in a book. Therefore, i’ve arranged a collection of ’39’ abstract and minimal photographic series by these ’32’ artists. A selection of pages from the book can be viewed below, a full book preview can be seen: HERE

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Thank you to everyone who contributed their images to this project.

All graphic content and curations by : Alan Wilson ( azurebumble )

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Book Cover
Front & Back Pages
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Introductory Pages
Copyright & Contents
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Introductory Pages
Tags, Artists & Series Thumbnails
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Photography Series
Gianni Galassi
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Photography Series
Teresa (Colourful Life) & roB_meL
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Photography Series
Camilo Todemann & Olli Kekäläinen
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Photography Series
Brancolina & Barbara Stumm
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Photography Series
Françoise Lucas & Leonie Polah
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Photography Series
Julian Gomez & Tom Mclaughlan
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Artists

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Alec Cheer……………………Annemie Hiele……………………..Azurebumble……………………Barbara Stumm

Brancolina………………….Camilo Todemann…………………..Daniel Molina…………………….Fernandoprats

Françoise Lucas…………….Gianni Galassi…………………….James Withey……………….John Kosmopoulos

Julian Gomez……………Krystina Stimakovits…………………Leonie Polah………………………….Lillykeeper

Lord Jezzer…………………..Lucie Bourassa…………………..Mark Valentine…………………..Olli Kekäläinen

Peter Moons…………………..Phédia Mazuc……………………..Rita Vita Finzi…………………………….roB_meL

Shari Baker……………………Steffen Tuck………………..Teresa (Colourful life)…………..Tom McLaughlan

Visualisarium…………………..Wilma Eras……………………Wouter Hogendorp……………………….Zel Nunes

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VIEW FULL BOOK PREVIEW AND PURCHASE HERE

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10
Nov
10

Matthew Northridge : Collage

Thin Black Line (detail)
collage on paper
22″ x 30″
2005

What to Do Today (What to Do Tomorrow) Detail
collage on paper
23″ x 27 1/2″
2010

What to Do Today (What to Do Tomorrow)
collage on paper
23″ x 27 1/2″
2010

Thin Black Line
collage on paper
22″ x 30″
2005

Untitled
collage on paper
11″ x 14″
2005

Contained within my work are serial arrangements and architectonic constructions. Whether composed of variable units in real space or networks on paper, rules are decided and a system developed from many parts. Much is borrowed from popular printed material (magazines, books, advertisements and packaging), where each element carries some of its previous meaning, language, and history. Excised from its original source, a fragment is combined with others to create a subjective framework, rooted in the act of collecting and cataloging. Through this process, materials transcend the mundane, forming the skeleton of a unique, nuanced structure. The scale consistently remains within the range of the architectural model and occupies the peculiar place of simultaneously being thoroughly complete and merely an unrealized prototype of something quite monumental. Though modestly scaled and constructed of simple, familiar materials, the subjects remain quite large and universal, ranging from environmental and climatic change to the precarious state of world government.

Matthew Northridge : Website




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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