Posts Tagged ‘Japan

17
Sep
12

Ryuji Miyamoto : “Cardboard Houses” Series (Photography)

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“All I can do is train my eyes and keep watching the world
as it goes on changing, scene after scene, again and again.”

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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Yokohama’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1996
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Osaka’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘London’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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Ryuji Miyamoto’s series of photographs called ‘Cardboard Houses’ depicts the living spaces created by the city’s organized homeless. The project began in the late 1980s but came to full fruition in the mid-1990s, just as Japan suffered from an economic crisis and the homeless population of Tokyo grew rapidly. Miyamoto is mainly known as an architectural photographer which might explain why he concentrated on the structures created by the organized homeless, rather then the homeless themselves. His cardboard houses are a typology of structures reminiscent of the ‘Water Towers’ by Bernd and Hilla Becher. Even his choice of black and white film, plate camera and silver gelatin printing techniques are an homage to the New Objectivity propagated by the Bechers. The view is supposed to be detached, objective, straight, uncompromising and cold. The images are meant to be documents that might inform the viewer on the cardboard chosen for the shacks or where the shacks have been built. Ryuji observed that the houses are predominantly located in the cracks that the megalopolis Tokyo supplies in abundance. While Becher’s water towers are fully exposed to light, space and the lens of the camera, Ryuji’s cardboard houses are usually next to, under or in between structures. [VCB]

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Ryuji Miyamoto : Michael Hoppen Gallery

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16
Aug
12

Andreas Gefeller : The Japan Series (Photography)

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“Poles 41”
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010
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“Poles 44”
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010
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“Poles 30”
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010
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“Poles 45”
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010
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“Poles 39”
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010
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“Poles 32”
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010
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“Poles 31”
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010
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Sensitizing and expanding our perception of what is allegedly a familiar reality is the attitude Düsseldorf-based photographer Andreas Gefeller adopts in his work. His most recent photographs are clearly more formal and structural, and they exhibit striking pictorial qualities. The Japan Series originated on the occasion of the European Eyes on Japan project, within the scope of which European photographers are invited each year to capture their impressions of this Far Eastern country on film. Gefeller takes at least two shots of utility poles vertically from below. In the subsequent digital composite the poles disappear, and the innumerable cables and transformers are converted into an abstract composition against a monochrome background. The absence of points of reference and orientation in these works opens up a new perspective on familiar situations. – [ Extract : Hatje Cantz]

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Andreas Gefeller : Website

More Works From Series

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22
Jul
12

Martin Stavars : “Nightscapes – Tokyo” Series (Photography)

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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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I’ve always been fascinated by landscapes – places that are absolutely desolate, where I can stay one on one with nature. For me, the growing joy right before pressing the shutter button as well as the possibility of interacting with the world filled with inspiration is as important as the creative act itself. This initial fascination has rapidly grown into obsession that eventually took control over my life. Since the beginning of my adventure with photography, every landscape has been an unforgettable experience, thanks to which I’ve learned how to interpret light – the single most important (and the single most waited for) factor that shapes my images. On the other hand, lighting is directly connected with another key element of photography – luck. Proper weather, interesting cloud patterns or even a couple of sunrays breaking through the clouds, have many times decided that after a couple of failed attempts I was able to reach a satisfactory effect the moment nature displayed her unpredictable face.

Lately, my interests widened to cityscapes, where I pursue qualities characteristic to nature – harmony and peace. As it’s getting harder to find traits like that in our more and more hectic world, while taking pictures in the biggest European cities I had to develop the most important virtue of a photographer – patience. That’s one of the reasons why there are usually no people (or only their silhouettes) in most of my photographs. But such character of my work is also a result of other factors. Whereas taking pictures with the main focus on a person involves emotions that are relatively easy to define, depicting an empty street or portraying pulsing nature usually requires different feelings that have to fill in for the missing elements, thus making such photographs more than a simple document. – Artist Statement

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Martin Stavars : Website

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14
Apr
11

Kompakt : Benefit Compilation for Japan : Digital Album

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Even if the headlines are now dominated by other topics – many of our Japanese friends are still in a dire situation. Kompakt’s family of distributed labels feels the urge to help, so here it comes: 34 tracks handpicked by the owners of some of the world’s leading labels in electronic music: Ostgut Ton, Freude Am Tanzen, Bpitch Control, Dial, Kompakt, Comeme, Raster Noton, Monika, RRrygular, Vidab Records, Optimo Music, Anticipate and many more. Ranging from ethereal ambient sounds to pumping club sounds of Berlin, New York’s new disco underground and leftfield experimentations there’s something for everyone. All money from this compilation goes directly to: The Deutsches Rotes Kreuz “Japan”

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Listen or Buy Here

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18
Jan
11

Andreas Gefeller : The Japan Series (Photography)

‘Poles 38’
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010

‘Poles 08’
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010

‘Poles 07’
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010

‘Poles 35’
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010

‘Poles 39’
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010

‘Poles 27’
Inkjetprint
100 x 100 cm
2010

Sensitizing and expanding our perception of what is allegedly a familiar reality is the attitude Düsseldorf-based photographer Andreas Gefeller adopts in his work. His most recent photographs are clearly more formal and structural, and they exhibit striking pictorial qualities. The Japan Series originated on the occasion of the European Eyes on Japan project, within the scope of which European photographers are invited each year to capture their impressions of this Far Eastern country on film.

Gefeller takes at least two shots of utility poles vertically from below. In the subsequent digital composite the poles disappear, and the innumerable cables and transformers are converted into an abstract composition against a monochrome background. The absence of points of reference and orientation in these works opens up a new perspective on familiar situations. [extract : hatje cantz]

Andreas Gefeller : Website

06
Dec
10

Onishi Yasuaki : ‘Reverse of Volume’ (Installation)

‘reverse of volume’
Aomori, Japan
installation
2009

‘reverse of volume’
Aomori, Japan
installation
2009

‘reverse of volume’
Aomori, Japan
installation
2009

‘reverse of volume’
Aomori, Japan
installation
2009

‘reverse of volume’
Aomori, Japan
installation
2009

‘reverse of volume’
Aomori, Japan
installation
2009

“I am interested in the visible and the invisible thing. Through my art work, I get information from the space and leave clues on the space. Form, color and movement is changed to the simple element, like points, lines and lights. It tells us the limited information. I would like to show the way of perception of this world through my work. Though each work doesn’t mean some specific matter or story, it will stimulate each imagination and thought. I think we can discover new value from the trivial matters.”

Onishi Yasuaki : Website




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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