Posts Tagged ‘installation



09
Mar
12

Berndnaut Smilde : ‘Nimbus’ Series (Probe – Exhibition)

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Probe is an exhibition space, with walls no higher then 1,10m and a surface of 6m2. It’s a test lab, an artistic skinner box. Its small and practical dimensions enables artists, to create works on scale, that are unthinkable in real life. The architecture of the space is flexible and wholly subservient to the exhibition: walls can be extended, doors can be removed, a floor made of glass, mirrors or wood, even the lighting situation can be fully controlled. Albeit a physical space, Probe is only accessible on the internet. The registration of the exhibition is the exhibition. Probe’s flexible dimensions proposes questions, as to the nature of space, seeing for example, that Probe can be wholly absorbed by the installation it contains. Exterior or interior, architecture or sculpture become relative notions. Probe can also be used as an exhibition making tool. The height, size and sequence of several works can be researched without having to drill a hole. Sketches used as dummies, scale warps achieved in seconds.

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Berndnaut is fascinated by anything in between… Corridors and clouds, not yet there
and not yet solid. What if a sculpture were to be nothing but thin air, smoke or scent?
We’d discuss the merits of one cloud over the other or would we just shut up in awe.

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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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Interview with Artist

1. How different was it to work in the space of Probe compared to other exhibition spaces?

I usually make a maquette of the space I’m going to work in. A maquette helps me to control and visualize an idea. It provides a clear overview. Probe itself is a model space, and worked for me in the same way: The manner of working is very direct and functional, and being so close to the subject changes the conception of materials and reality. The space is being emphasized. You create an ideal situation and therefore I think the model can stand for an idea. Working in Probe provides an additional point of view to exhibition making and that is an almost god-like position in which you have control over everything. I think it is similar to why people like model-train-landscaping. It’s having total power.

2. What did you want to create in Probe?

I imagined walking into a museum hall with just empty walls. The place even looked deserted. On the one hand I wanted to create an ominous situation. You could see the cloud as a sign of misfortune. You could also read it as an element out of the Dutch landscape paintings in a physical form in a classical museum hall. At the same time I wanted to make (for once) a very clear image, an almost cliché and cartoon like visualisation of having bad luck.

3. What obstacles did you run into?

The idea I had was going to be an ephemeral work. It would only exist as a photo. I thought this would work very well with the idea of Probe, as the exhibitions only exist in the form of documentation. I didn’t realize there is in fact a very physical aspect about Probe’s presentation. The 9 different perspectives of documentation make it possible for the spectator to wander around the space and create the opportunity of visiting the exhibition. Therefore with every shoot we had to make a new cloud and keep in account approximately the same lighting and position to create the illusion of physically walking through the space.

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Berndnaut Smilde : Website

Project Probe

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02
Mar
12

Ursula Mumenthaler : ‘Peter Merian Haus’ (Installation)

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‘Le champ bleu’
Peter Merian Haus, Bâle
Installation
1997-1999
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‘Le champ bleu’
Peter Merian Haus, Bâle
Installation
1997-1999
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‘Le champ bleu’
Peter Merian Haus, Bâle
Installation
1997-1999
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‘Le champ bleu’
Peter Merian Haus, Bâle
Installation
1997-1999
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‘Le champ bleu’
Peter Merian Haus, Bâle
Installation
1997-1999
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Installation : ‘le champ bleu’
Architect : Zwimpfer Partner
Project : Peter-Merian-Haus

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Ursula Mumenthaler : Website

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02
Feb
12

Cuppetelli and Mendoza : ‘Nervous Structure’ (field) Series

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Made in collaboration by Annica Cuppetelli and Cristobal Mendoza.

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The Nervous Structure series consists of interactive installations that revolve around the idea of interface, interpreted as the point of contact between two different entities. The work consists of several such interfaces: between the viewer and the piece (a human/computer interface); between the real and the virtual (the physical structure and its relationship with the projected structure); between the foreground and background (as the projection interferes with its shadow). It consist of a soft structure made out of elastic or spandex and a projector that illuminates it with computer-generated graphics. Viewers interact with the piece by moving in the field of vision of a camera, which is connected to the computer; this motion is transformed by the software into forces that affect the projected lines…

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Cuppetelli and Mendoza : Website

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29
Jan
12

Georges Rousse : ‘Site-Specific Installations’

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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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After he discovered Land Art and Malevich’s Black Square against a white field, Georges Rousse altered his relationship to photography, inventing a unique approach that shifted the relationship of painting to space. He began making installations in the types of abandoned or derelict buildings that have long held an attraction for him – creating ephemeral, one-of-a-kind artworks by transforming these sites into pictorial spaces that are visible only in his photographs.

Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas. His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, that of creating a photographic image.

In these empty spaces, Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world–his imaginary “universe.” His creation both expresses his artistic intentions and resonates with his impressions of the site, its history and its culture. Finally, this results in a photograph, a flat plane, so the shapes he paints and draws, and the volumes and architectural constructions he creates in those massive spaces seem fractured or split on different levels. His photo brings together painting, architecture, and drawing. It carves out a new space in which the artist’s fictive world becomes visible. At the heart of this questioning, his work deals with our relationship to Space and Time. [Extract : Bio]

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Georges Rousse : Website

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25
Jan
12

Jordan Tull : ‘Re/Activate’ (Installation)

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Wieden + Kennedy Gallery – Portland, Oregon
Re/Activate is a collaborative installation with artist Damien Gilley

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‘Re/Activate’
amber acrylic, mirror acrylic, fluorescent lamps
paint, screws, artist’s tape, vinyl, wood
dimensions variable
2011
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‘Re/Activate’
amber acrylic, mirror acrylic, fluorescent lamps
paint, screws, artist’s tape, vinyl, wood
dimensions variable
2011
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‘Re/Activate’
amber acrylic, mirror acrylic, fluorescent lamps
paint, screws, artist’s tape, vinyl, wood
dimensions variable
2011
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‘Re/Activate’
amber acrylic, mirror acrylic, fluorescent lamps
paint, screws, artist’s tape, vinyl, wood
dimensions variable
2011
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‘Re/Activate’
amber acrylic, mirror acrylic, fluorescent lamps
paint, screws, artist’s tape, vinyl, wood
dimensions variable
2011
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‘Re/Activate’
amber acrylic, mirror acrylic, fluorescent lamps
paint, screws, artist’s tape, vinyl, wood
dimensions variable
2011
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Jordan Tull explores the exchange between artwork, site, and viewer through sculpture and installation. Tull has produced site-specific sculpture responding to architectural settings throughout Portland, OR. His object-based sculptures explore structural and perceptual phenomenon through geometric abstraction and allusive metaphor. Tull’s current work advances for the development of new spatial languages experienced within the context of contemporary architecture and sculptural discourse. Through technology, collaboration and experimentation Tull creates radical asymmetries, ordering systems and dynamic geometric progressions as applied to site-specific contexts and computer-generated models. Tull’s works aim to establish an alternative perceptual approach to spatial applications through the employment of computer-aided fabrication technology and space manipulation.

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Jordan Tull : Website

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21
Jan
12

Simona Pries : ‘I never promised you a kiss’ (Installation)

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‘I never promised you a kiss’ (Installation)
Clear Plexiglas, 36 fluorescent tubes, speakers
Treatment beds, Aluminium profiles, Translucent fabric
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‘I never promised you a kiss’ (Installation)
Clear Plexiglas, 36 fluorescent tubes, speakers
Treatment beds, Aluminium profiles, Translucent fabric
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‘I never promised you a kiss’ (Installation)
Clear Plexiglas, 36 fluorescent tubes, speakers
Treatment beds, Aluminium profiles, Translucent fabric
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‘I never promised you a kiss’ (Installation)
Clear Plexiglas, 36 fluorescent tubes, speakers
Treatment beds, Aluminium profiles, Translucent fabric
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Myth and fairy tales have been considered at all times by the artist, since in them is concentrated much human knowledge. The eternal questions that present themselves to every generation to seek and answer (Why I’m here at all?, What’s the point of my existence? Where did I come from and where am I going?) are highlighted in myths and fairy tales and always have been. Therefore, they are still the basis of inspiration for many artists, because they contain such fertile ground for the exploration of existential questions. This is certainly true of Simona Pries, a trained sculptor and architect, whose large installation shown four years ago in Celle Castle, explicitly refers to the fairy tale “Sleeping Beauty” by the Brothers Grimm. Pries presents in her cases three identical translucent fabrics, their shape is reminiscent of the structural modules of Minimalist Art and it is clear in each case that they have the same deck visible, as we know from hospitals. The call isn’t only the memory of a hundred-year sleep of a Princess, but also the fragility and finite nature of man. From four speakers we hear the story of “Sleeping Beauty”, whilst the beds of colored light seem to be from some long forgotten dream. She reminds us that our life is dangerous, full of pain and injuries, tests and crises, but that every crisis also holds the opportunity for growth… – [Extract : Text – “Of myths and fairy tales” – Michael Stoeber]

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Simona Pries : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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