Posts Tagged ‘industrial materials

11
Sep
11

Rachel Whiteread : Sculpture

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‘Untitled (Rubber Torso)’
High Density Rubber
3 1/2 x 7 1/8 x 10 3/8 in
1994

‘Index’
Plaster (two units)
10 5/8 x 11 5/8 x 10 1/4 in
2005

‘Hold’
Plaster, wood and aluminum
9 1/4 x 23 5/8 x 9 7/8 in
2005

‘Cabinet II’
Metal and plaster (one metal cupboard and 43 plaster units)
17 3/4 x 18 1/2 x 17 1/2 in
2006

‘Study’
Plaster and wood
36 x 73 5/8 x 21 1/4 in
2005

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The artist Rachel Whiteread creates elegant and poetic sculptures which explore architecture, space, absence and memory. Often inspired by the physicality of the human body, her works are poignant for their exploration of intimate domestic spaces and household objects. Whiteread typically uses industrial materials such as plaster, resin and rubber to cast the negative space surrounding or within an object – the murky darkness beneath a bed frame, the void within a humble cardboard box, the space in and around a myriad collection of books. The resulting sculptures retain the texture and shape of the original objects, yet are eerie ghosts of their former selves.

Whiteread is perhaps best known for several large-scale public commissions such as House, a sculpture cast from the interior of a condemned Victorian house in London’ s East End, Water Tower, a resin cast of the water towers ubiquitous to the New York City skyline, Monument, an inverted pedestal placed upon an empty plinth in Trafalgar Square and the Holocaust Memorial in Vienna, an impenetrable library of books turned inwards in commemoration of the thousands of Austrian Jews who perished during World War II. Like her smaller sculptures, these monumental works are distinguished by their minimalist sensibility and their capacity to evoke stillness and contemplation.

Rachel Whiteread has a long list of international distinctions which include winning the 1993 Turner Prize for House, representing Great Britain in the 1997 Venice Biennale and presenting solo exhibitions at such prestigious institutions as the Kunsthalle Basel, the Reina Sofia, The Serpentine Gallery and the Deutsche Guggenheim. Her work is housed in museums and private collections around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, the Tate Modern, London and the Centre Pompidou, Paris. The artist lives and works in London, England. [Bio]

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Rachel Whiteread : Luhring Augustine

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12
Jul
10

Donald Judd : ‘The Simple Expression Of Complex Thought’.

Donald Judd
Cloth in Illustrated Jacket
1993

Donald Judd
Untitled
1987

Donald Judd
Menziken 87-55
1987

Donald Judd
Untitled
1974

Donald Judd
Untitled
1971

Donald Judd
Untitled (Core Piece)
1969

Donald Judd
Untitled
1972

One of the most significant American artists of the post-war period, Donald Judd changed the course of modern sculpture. Working in New York in the 1960s, Judd became known as one of the key exponents of ‘Minimalism’, but it was a label that he strongly rejected. Although he shared many of the principles identified with Minimalist art — the use of industrial materials to create abstract works that emphasise the purity of colour, form, space and materials — he preferred to describe his own work as ‘the simple expression of complex thought’.

In the late 1940s he began to practice as a painter, but by the late 1950s was working to free his painting of traditional ‘European’ preoccupations with composition and illusionism. In the early 1960s, Judd began to introduce three dimensional elements onto the surface of his works, at first creating reliefs, and then moving towards entirely free-standing structures which he called ‘specific objects’. By 1963 he had established an essential vocabulary of forms — ‘stacks’, ‘boxes’ and ‘progressions’ — which preoccupied him for the next thirty years.

Judd broke new ground in his exploration of volume, interval, space and colour . He rejected the tradition of artistic expression and craftsmanship by using industrial materials such as Plexiglas, sheet metal and plywood, and from the mid-1960s his works were fabricated by external manufacturers. By encouraging concentration on the volume and presence of the structure and the space around it, Judd’s work draws particular attention to the relationship between the object, the viewer, and its environment. This relationship became a central focus of Judd’s career, and he devoted much of his later life to the sympathetic installation of his own work.

Judd’s engagement with philosophy, architecture, design and politics informed his own work, and influenced succeeding generations of artists and designers. His pared-down forms and sensuous use of industrial materials remain a feature of much contemporary art, architecture and design. [Extract : Tate Modern]

Donald Judd : Tate Collection

Nick Serota on Donald Judd : Videos




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