Posts Tagged ‘iconic

23
Jun
12

Ezra Stoller : Architectural Photography

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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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TWA Terminal, Eero Saarinen, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1962
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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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Guggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1959
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Louis Isidore Kahn, Olivetti Underwood Factory, Harrisburg
Gelatin Silver Print
Ezra Stoller
1966-1970
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Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1963
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Milwaukee War Memorial, Eero Saarinen
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1952
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Ezra Stoller’s gelatin silver prints include images of architectural interiors and iconic landmarks. Based on his background in architecture and industrial design, Stoller used a large-format camera to photograph monumental 20th century buildings, including the Guggenheim Museum, the TWA terminal at Idlewild Airport (now John F. Kennedy International Airport), the Seagram Building, the Salk Institute, Yale Art and Architecture Building and Fallingwater. In addition to well-known photographs of these locations, these works also include lesser-known photographs of small homes and guest houses which provide a fresh look at the masterful eye that established Stoller as the preeminent photographer of modern architecture. A pioneer in the field of architectural photography, Ezra Stoller was commissioned by architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph, Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Marcel Breuer and Richard Meier, because of his unique ability to capture the building according to the architect’s vision and to lock it into the architectural canon. His photographs convey a three-dimensional experience of architectural space through a two-dimensional medium, with careful attention to vantage point and lighting condition, as well as line, color, form and texture. – [Extract : Press Release – Yossi Milo Gallery]

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Ezra Stoller : Yossi Milo Gallery

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07
Apr
11

Andrea Gallo : “Six Architects” Posters

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
German Universal Exposition Pavilion
Barcelona

Walter Gropius
Bauhaus School and Faculty
Dessau

Frank Lloyd Wright
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
New York

Alvar Aalto
University School of Science and Technology
Helsinki

Louis Kahn
National Assembly Building of Bangladesh
Dhaka

Le Corbusier
Notre Dame du Haut
Ronchamp

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Andrea Gallo : More Posters

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10
Jul
10

Richard Wilson : 20:50

Created over 20 years ago, this spectacular waist-high reservoir of recycled sump oil, one of

Britart’s most iconic installations and has been exhibited at his various galleries in London.

Installed at the new Saatchi building in Chelsea, the timeless work is well worth another look …

The artist Richard Wilson poses with his installation,

a vast tank made out of sheet metal and filled to the brim with thick sump oil

Wilson has become renowned for his site-specific installations. Of this work he says:

‘It can be applied to any internal space … and in each space it will be radically different

because it will reflect it and adapt to its parameters’

The work, in the basement of Saatchi’s new gallery in Chelsea,

reflects the architecture of the room, seemingly doubling its size

A walkway invites visitors directly through the tank,

so that they are surrounded by the reflective plane of oil

The installation contains 8,000 litres of sump oil 20:50, from which the work takes its name

[images and text : guardian.co.uk Tuesday 12 January 2010]

Richard Wilson : Saatchi Gallery : Sump Oil and Steel : Video

Richard Wilson’s 20:50 is truly a contemporary masterpiece. 20:50 transforms the gallery into a site of epic illusion. Viewed from the entrance platform 20:50 appears as a holographic field: simultaneously a polished floor, infinite clear pool, an expansive and indefinable virtual space that clinically absorbs and mirrors the gallery architecture. The room is in fact entirely flooded in oil.

Visitors are invited to examine the piece close-up via a walkway that extends into the lake, placing the viewer, waist deep, at the centre of a perfect mathematically symmetrical scope. Through this altered perspective 20:50’s phantasmical aura is enhanced, amplifying the disorientating and mesmerising experience of the space, and further confounding physical logic.

20:50 takes its name from the type of recycled engine oil used. It is thick, pitch black, and absolutely indelible: please take extreme care with your clothing and belongings, and no matter how tempting, please do not touch. 20:50 often has to be demonstrated to be believed: the liquid can be seen by blowing very gently on the surface. [extract : Saatchi Gallery]

Richard Wilson : Saatchi Gallery




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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