Posts Tagged ‘house

17
Dec
10

Dragana Crnjak : Works on Paper

“The experience of love is as close as most of us get, after childhood’s end, to feeling that we are not bound by our skin, that the circumference of self can be moved or penetrated or dissolved in union with another…our surrender to love is a touching of skin to cancel out that boundary.” (Nachmanovitch)

House #11
Charcoal, pastel on paper
36 X 36 inches
2007

House # 4
Charcoal on paper
42″ X 42″
2006

House # 3
Charcoal, pastel on paper
42″ X 42″
2006

House # 7
Charcoal, pastel on paper
42″ X 42″
2007

Interior # 1
Charcoal, pastel on paper
42″ X 42″
2007

House # 8
Charcoal, pastel on paper
42″ X 42″
2007

My work, in general, is a search for re-enchantment, for a way to reach below the surface of things, to find that point of connection with life. I want to engage the viewer in a sensory experience, one that is un-camera-like, un-computer-like. My goal is to nudge the viewer into a deeper experience of the present, where the “circumference of self” is dissolved – to provide a moment of contemplation without literally telling a story.

The current series, loosely based on a metaphorical concept of the garden, continues the search for “re-enchantment.” It attempts to evoke an experience through the relationship of surface marks, the material of the paint itself and color, alluding to an abstract garden – a place set apart, penetrating the “circumference of self,” where awareness is expanded and the senses enriched. The works are constructed as a kind of palimpsest, a layering of forms and feelings, providing a point of departure with multiple meanings. [artists statement]

Dragana Crnjak : Website

Dragana Crnjak : Page Bond Gallery

Dragana Crnjak : Kathryn Markel Fine Arts

08
Jul
10

Wolfgang Laib : Artist

Untitled
1996
beeswax and wooden construction

Untitled
1996
beeswax and wooden construction

Nowhere-Everywhere
1998
beeswax and wooden construction

Untitled
2000
beeswax and wood

Untitled
1990 – 1991
beeswax and wood

The odor of sanctity can sometimes be a literal thing. The religiosity that hung in the air of Wolfgang Laib’s recent show was partly a product of iconography-shapes resembling sarcophagi, walls reminiscent of Egyptian temples, but it was also a synesthetic response to the scent of beeswax. The show consisted of just two architectural-scale works. High on the back wall of the main room was a pair of long, low, peak-roofed beeswax boxes. Each roughly the size and shape of a child’s coffin, they were held aloft by pairs of stubby wood beams that carried them the way an acolyte might bear a reliquary.

The power of Laib’s work, which might be described as Spiritual Minimalism, rests largely on the materials he chooses-such as milk, rice and pollen in addition to beeswax-substances suggestive of life’s essentials and of a kind of numinous purity. There is nothing extraneous, nothing unnecessary in Laib’s work. [extract : Art in America, June 1991, pp. 137-138, 1 June 1991 : Susan Tallman]

Wolfgang Laib : Works

Sperone Westwater Gallery : A Retrospective




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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