Posts Tagged ‘history

18
Apr
12

Roy Arden : Collages

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‘Under the Sun’
Roy Arden
Collage
2007
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‘Vertical’
Roy Arden
Collage
2007
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‘Sur L’herbe’
Roy Arden
Collage
2009
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‘Quick and Painful’
Roy Arden
Collage
2009
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‘Its all about’
Roy Arden
Collage
2007
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‘Fearless’
Roy Arden
Collage
2007
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‘Colossal Youth’
Roy Arden
Collage
2007
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‘Around the World’
Roy Arden
Collage
2009
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Over the last decade Arden has widened his artistic practice to include collages, videos, paintings, sculpture and web-based projects. However, even though his working practice is becoming more diverse, certain themes continue to run though his work. These are history, modernity and the archive. Arden has created his own immense archive of images, that he has collected from newspapers, magazines and the internet that he continually uses in his different series of works. Driven by a personal necessity, Arden delves into the trash heap of history for images that reveal something about how and why we arrived at our present predicament. Arden’s paper collages are intimate in scale and seem to channel the history of collage while entertaining various subjects through their kaleidoscope of cut and torn fragments. His digital collages are generally more orderly and speak of the need to archive and its attendant folly. Arden’s more recent paintings and drawings present singular images in a graphic style similar to early Pop Art but always with critical intent. [Extract : Brancolini Grimaldi Gallery]

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Roy Arden : Website

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30
Mar
12

Kikuji Kawada : ‘Chizu – The Map’ Series (Photography Book)

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‘Scraps’
Chizu (The Map) series
gelatin silver print
1959-1965
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‘The Japanese National Flag’
Chizu (The Map) series
gelatin silver print
1960
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‘Scraps’
Chizu (The Map) series
gelatin silver print
1959-1965
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‘Scraps’
Chizu (The Map) series
gelatin silver print
1959-1965
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‘Atomic Dome, Ceiling, Stain of Blood’
Chizu (The Map) series
gelatin silver print
1960-1961
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‘Atomic Dome, Scriblings by Tourists’
Chizu (The Map) series
gelatin silver print
1960-1961
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‘Atomic Dome, Ceiling, Stain of Blood’
Chizu (The Map) series
gelatin silver print
1960-1961
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“No photobook has been more successful in combining graphic design with complex photographic narrative… [as its] various layers inside [are] peeled away like archaeological strata, the whole process of viewing the book becomes one of uncovering and contemplating the ramifications of recent Japanese history — especially the country’s tangled relationship with the United States… His photographs are a masterly amalgam of abstraction and realism, of the specific and the ineffable, woven into a tapestry that makes the act of reading them a process of re-creation in itself. In the central metaphor of the map, in the idea of the map as a series of interlocking trace marks, Kawada has conjured a brilliant simile for the photograph itself: scientific record, memory trace, cultural repository, puzzle and guide…”

[Extract : The Photobook: A History, Volume 1, by Martin Parr and Gerry Badger]

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Kikuji Kawada : SFMOMA

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05
Feb
12

Felice Varini : Site-Specific Installations (Paintings)

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‘Ellipse in red trapezoid’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2008
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‘Trapezoid in red ellipse’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2008
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‘Red ellipse for the window’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1995
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‘Eight eccentric circles No.1’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1998
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‘Three red triangles’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2001
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‘Ellipse on two points’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1997
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‘Ellipse with six circular holes’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2000
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“My field of action is architectural space and everything that constitutes such space These spaces are and remain the original media for my painting. I work “on site” each time in a different space and my work develops itself in relation to the spaces I encounter. I generally roam through the space noting its architecture, materials, history and function. From these spatial data and in reference to the last piece I produced, I designate a specific vantage point for viewing from which my intervention takes shape.

The vantage point is carefully chosen: it is generally situated at my eye level and located preferably along an inevitable route, for instance an aperture between one room and another, a landing… I do not, however, make a rule out of this, for all spaces do not systematically possess an evident line. It is often an arbitrary choice. The vantage point will function as a reading point, that is to say, as a potential starting point to approaching painting and space.

The painted form achieves its coherence when the viewer stands at the vantage point.When he moves out of it, the work meets with space generating infinite vantage points on the form. It is not therefore through this original vantage point that I see the work achieved; it takes place in the set of vantage points the viewer can have on it. If I establish a particular relation to architectural features that influence the installation shape, my work still preserves its independence whatever architectural spaces I encounter. I start from an actual situation to construct my painting. Reality is never altered, erased or modified, it interests and seduces me in its complexity. I work “here and now”. – Felice Varini

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Felice Varini : Website

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23
Jan
12

Osheen Harruthoonyan: ‘Black Garden’ Series (Photography)

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“It’s easy to lose sight of exactly who you are while passing through the ‘Black Garden’. At the start, things are clear, there’s you and there’s the land, you each have your names and the division is simple.

Yet even from a peak within Nagorno-Karabakh you’re lost in the panorama. Mountain after mountain begets valley upon valley. A singular road runs through it all and though the end is too far to make out, you trust there’s an end. In your immediate vicinity at any given time you lose yourself in the intimacy of the trees, the overgrown foliage, the tombstones of an abandoned graveyard like fossilised crevices disintegrating in the wind. Voices buried beneath the moss, and cumulative silence, whisper about war.

There are small signs of life, a singular bird, a crucifix like a question mark that would cease to be seen if not for a blinking flame between the dripping walls of a crumbling cave. As night falls, shadows cannot be deciphered from leaves. Something floats by your eye, mouches volontes, a schism in the visual fabric, produced by your mind or the air, it does not matter. Your heart beats out what colour is left of the fading day and at once you are included and excluded from the landscape…” – Amy Pagnotta

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‘Black Garden’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Black Mirror’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Swan’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
28 x 35 inches
2011
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‘Wave’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Schism’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Tree of Garni’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Mercury’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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Born in Persia and raised in Athens, Greece and Vancouver B.C., Osheen Harruthoonyan is a Toronto based photographer and filmmaker. Drawing upon his rich experiences living in such diverse cities, he employs a multi-faceted approach towards his artistic practice, investigating memory, history and the deconstructive process of time. Osheen’s work has been featured on Bravo! Arts Channel and his exhibitions in Toronto have consistently been noted as a top show not to miss. Harruthoonyan has also worked as a cinematographer on numerous short films, music videos, and experimental films.

Osheen Harruthoonyan’s sumptuous photographic prints evoke the uncertain, fledgling flashes encountered at the threshold of a dream. Combining traditional large-format photography with a variety of analog photo-manipulation techniques, Harruthoonyan skillfully renders his subjects within ethereally illusive environments. The fastidious striations and cracks of his altered film negatives become esoteric anomalies that hearken to a unique and singular “subterranean realm”.

Harruthoonyan’s willingness to take risks within the confines of the traditional photographic process makes this representational capacity possible. Altering each negative by hand, his works crystallize midway between the calculable and the spontaneous, addressing both the systematic and the chaotic. His careful yet playful inventiveness unravels the mysteries of our collective irreconcilable reverie. Harruthoonyan’s creations conjure the lifetimes that exist within moments, and the glimmers of strangeness that give pause to our ever-evolving subconscious states. Within his work, we witness not only the captured image, but the very process of image-making laid bare. – [Ex : La Petite Mort Gallery]

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Osheen Harruthoonyan : Website

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08
Feb
11

Hans Op de Beeck : Installations

Hans Op de Beeck
Extentions (2)
Sculptural Installation
2007

Hans Op de Beeck
Extentions (2)
Sculptural Installation
2007

Hans Op de Beeck
Extentions (2)
Sculptural Installation
2007

Hans Op de Beeck
Sea of Tranquillity
Exhibition
2010

Hans Op de Beeck
Sea of Tranquillity
Exhibition
2010

Hans Op de Beeck
Sea of Tranquillity
Exhibition
2010

Op de Beeck’s spatial works, videos and photos of many different scenes of everyday life are all decontextualisations. His representations rip scenes from their original context so that their reason for existence at once becomes disputable. His videos for example are fragments from everyday life, but have been enlarged to such an extent that an alienating image emerges. The same goes for his life size models. It is just these uninteresting spaces, such as an unremarkable housing estate, or an empty cross roads with traffic lights at night that he rebuilds in every exquisite boring detail. However by omitting certain small elements his representation gain a bizarre character. Hans is very subtle and also somewhat romantic. It is not just the high degree of care he takes in carrying out his work, but also his focus on small, often unconscious actions: a look, a silence, a gesture, a symbol etc, that, apart from alienating, also evoke something quite enchanting. The recognition and the compassion, or even the memories these representations conjure up in the viewer, strike very close to the bone. [Bio]

Hans Op de Beeck : Website

11
Jul
10

Miroslaw Balka : How It Is

Miroslaw Balka is the tenth artist to be invited to transform the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern. Born in Warsaw, Poland, his work explores themes of history and common experience, drawing on his Catholic upbringing and the fractured history of Poland.

The latest commission in The Unilever Series, How It Is by Polish artist Miroslaw Balka, is a giant grey steel structure holding a vast dark chamber, which in its construction reflects the surrounding architecture of Tate Modern – almost as if the interior space of the Turbine Hall has been turned inside out. Hovering somewhere between sculpture and architecture, it sits on two-metre stilts and stands thirteen metres high and thirty metres long. Visitors can walk underneath it, listening to the echoing sound of footsteps on steel above, or enter via a ramp into its pitch-black interior.

How It Is alludes to recent Polish history – for example, the ramp at the entrance to the Ghetto in Warsaw, or the trucks which took Jews away to the camps of Treblinka or Auschwitz. By entering the dark space, visitors place considerable trust in the organisation, something akin to the risks often taken by immigrants travelling. Balka intends to provide an experience for visitors which is both personal and collective, creating a range of sensory and emotional experiences through sound, contrasting light and shade, individual experience and awareness of others, perhaps provoking feelings of apprehension, excitement or intrigue. [extract : Tate Modern]

TATE CHANNEL : UNILEVER SERIES : MIROSLAW BALKA : HOW IT IS : VIDEO




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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