Posts Tagged ‘high-contrast

29
Nov
12

Luca Baldassari : “Aereogrammi” Series (Photography)

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“a006”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a0015”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a008”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a009”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a0013”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a003”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a005”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“I don’t know much about my philosophy which is still being defined, but to tell the truth I don’t think it really needs to be defined. I mainly use the pinhole camera, a technique that I have used now for over 20 years. The cameras and hand holes are all made by me, this is one of the reasons why I decided to use this technique since it allows me to build my own visual space/photo space in full freedom and to use all the sensitive materials provided by polaroid and fuji, from photo paper to digital. I can also use long exposure times and see life and things from a different point of view, giving me time to think and understand better… The common theme of my photos is often the journey, where the photos can be used as a clipboard memory, hence on returning from my travels I can re-elaborate my ideas and seek common themes to link the images together.” Luca Baldassari

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Luca Baldassari : Website

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21
Aug
12

Black Opal : Photography

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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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Black Opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2011
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2010
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2009
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2010
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2010
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2010
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Black Opal : Flickr

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30
Jul
12

Daido Moriyama : Photography Series

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“For me, photography is not a means by which to create beautiful art,
but a unique way of encountering genuine reality” ~ Daido Moriyama

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“Record No.15”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Record No.15”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Record No.18”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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Daido Moriyama (b.1938, Osaka) is one of Japan’s leading figures in photography. Witness to the spectacular changes that transformed post WWII Japan, his black and white photographs express a fascination with the cultural contradictions of age-old traditions that persist within modern society. Providing a harsh, crude vision of city life and the chaos of everyday existence, strange worlds, and unusual characters, his work occupies a unique space between the objective and the subjective, the illusory and the real. Moriyama’s use of a small hand held automatic camera gives his images a loose and casual aesthetic, undermined by a forceful and decisive point of view. – Extract : Luhring Augustine

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Daido Moriyama : Website

Daido Moriyama : Luhring Augustine

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22
Jul
12

Martin Stavars : “Nightscapes – Tokyo” Series (Photography)

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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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I’ve always been fascinated by landscapes – places that are absolutely desolate, where I can stay one on one with nature. For me, the growing joy right before pressing the shutter button as well as the possibility of interacting with the world filled with inspiration is as important as the creative act itself. This initial fascination has rapidly grown into obsession that eventually took control over my life. Since the beginning of my adventure with photography, every landscape has been an unforgettable experience, thanks to which I’ve learned how to interpret light – the single most important (and the single most waited for) factor that shapes my images. On the other hand, lighting is directly connected with another key element of photography – luck. Proper weather, interesting cloud patterns or even a couple of sunrays breaking through the clouds, have many times decided that after a couple of failed attempts I was able to reach a satisfactory effect the moment nature displayed her unpredictable face.

Lately, my interests widened to cityscapes, where I pursue qualities characteristic to nature – harmony and peace. As it’s getting harder to find traits like that in our more and more hectic world, while taking pictures in the biggest European cities I had to develop the most important virtue of a photographer – patience. That’s one of the reasons why there are usually no people (or only their silhouettes) in most of my photographs. But such character of my work is also a result of other factors. Whereas taking pictures with the main focus on a person involves emotions that are relatively easy to define, depicting an empty street or portraying pulsing nature usually requires different feelings that have to fill in for the missing elements, thus making such photographs more than a simple document. – Artist Statement

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Martin Stavars : Website

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13
Jul
12

Royale : Howlin’ Wolf – “Evil” (Animation & Music Video)

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We recently created this music video for “Evil” by Howlin’ Wolf as part of the Videophonic session at the 2012 PromaxBDA Conference. The catch? All of the nine videos could only feature music that rocked out pre-MTV. Most of us weren’t even born then. Ha. We envisioned a Western narrative that felt more analog than digital. Our all-CG video featured high contrast white on black “scratch board” imagery. Ext

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Royale : Vimeo

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12
Jul
12

Masahisa Fukase : “The Solitude of Ravens” (Photography)

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Masahisa Fukase is considered to be both a legend and an enigma in his native Japan. For a culture that is traditionally reluctant to expose emotion in public, the expressionistic character of his work was, in part, the result of the development of the generation that evolved after WWII. Fukase growing up in a decade in which mannered self-control was not the ideal civic behavior. This new perspective, coupled with the effects of war, exploded into the avant-garde scene in Tokyo. Inelegant printing techniques emerged and the manic style of photography that he shared with his contemporaries, such as Eikoh Hosoe, Daidoh Moriyama, and Shomei Tomatsu, reflected the “reaction to a world turned upside down.”

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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase’s expressionist photo series on the species of ravens represents a ten-year-obsession with the dark-edged worlds of ravens, shot on annual trips from Tokyo to Hokkaido, Fukase’s birthplace. Clearly the omen of misfortune, that has been traditionally assigned to ravens in almost all cultures, reigns over the sombre photographs taken. These display isolated or massive groupings of ravens, variously appearing at night or by day throughout a diverse Japanese landscape. Sitting on telephone poles, at the beach or on the edges of villages, the ravens’ immutable and terrifying presence permeates these photographs with signs of potential, impending or sure loss. The darkened nature of the pictures might not be coincidental regarding that they were taken in a period of personal pain and suffering after the photographer’s divorce in 1976. Fukase’s works are part of the Japanese new photography that is wrenched into different forms based on the spirit of personal experience and contrasting the earlier ideal of mannered self-control [Extract : Artnet]

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Masahisa Fukase : Wirtz Gallery

Masahisa Fukase : Robert Mann Gallery

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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