Posts Tagged ‘grainy

29
Nov
12

Luca Baldassari : “Aereogrammi” Series (Photography)

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“a006”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a0015”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a008”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a009”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a0013”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a003”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“a005”
“aereogrammi” series
photograph
2008
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“I don’t know much about my philosophy which is still being defined, but to tell the truth I don’t think it really needs to be defined. I mainly use the pinhole camera, a technique that I have used now for over 20 years. The cameras and hand holes are all made by me, this is one of the reasons why I decided to use this technique since it allows me to build my own visual space/photo space in full freedom and to use all the sensitive materials provided by polaroid and fuji, from photo paper to digital. I can also use long exposure times and see life and things from a different point of view, giving me time to think and understand better… The common theme of my photos is often the journey, where the photos can be used as a clipboard memory, hence on returning from my travels I can re-elaborate my ideas and seek common themes to link the images together.” Luca Baldassari

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Luca Baldassari : Website

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20
Aug
12

Pierre Masseau : Photography

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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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“Untitled”
Pierre Masseau
Photograph
2012
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Pierre Masseau : Flickr

Pierre Masseau : 『CHARBON』

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03
Jul
12

Takuma Nakahira : “For a Language to Come” (Photography 2)

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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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Published in 1970, “For a Language to Come” is recorded in the history of photography as the first photobook by Takuma Nakahira, the photographer who brought about a turning point in contemporary Japanese photography from the late 1960s to the early 1970s by radically breaking away from the existing image aesthetics at that time. This book consists of one hundred black and white photographs including his work from the legendary photography magazine “Provoke.” However, forty years after the publication of the original book, we have not as yet had the opportunity to examine (and enjoy) his works enough with the exception of a few photographs that has been repeatedly introduced on various occasions (this is particularly true in Europe and the U.S. where the history of contemporary Japanese photography remains less appreciated). Through radical self-critique, Nakahira would repudiate much of this early body of work in his 1973 essay, “Why an Illustrated Botanical Dictionary?” and considered it as something that must be overcome. Yet, for us to reconsider the meaning of the author’s rejection of his inaugural work, it is extremely valuable to know what the works themselves show. Has our history of photography finally caught up with Nakahira? The 2010 republication of “For a Language to Come,” is an attempt to engage Nakahira’s photographic point of departure again in the present, to discover this work as one that is more vibrantly resonant today. [Extract : Osiris Publishing]

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Takuma Nakahira : Shugo Arts

Takuma Nakahira : American Suburb X

Takuma Nakahira : “For a Language to Come” part 1

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02
Jul
12

Takuma Nakahira : ‘For a Language to Come’ (Photography)

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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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Blurred, grainy and out-of-focus was the modus operandi of the Japanese Provoke photographers of the early 1970s, and Takuma Nakahira was the intellectual granddaddy of them all. This reprint of his classic ‘For a Language to Come’ is shot with harsh black and white images printed full bleed across every page and is essential viewing for anybody with an interest in the history of photography. It’s a book of landscapes, urban landscapes where life clings to the shadows and corners of the pictures, where light burns like fire and the only solace is to be found in the underpasses and tunnels of the city that Nakahira portrays. And what a city! It’s an unwelcoming place, a Tokyo where post-war modernisation and political protest have combined to create a world lacking in any warmth or humanity.

Nakahira’s Tokyo is a pre-apocalyptic dead zone. Or perhaps it’s a post-apocalyptic deadzone. It doesn’t really matter because the effect is the same; a place where people lie injured in waiting rooms, where phone lines and power cables suggest an entity that has taken on its own hostile life, where the only means of escape are suggested by the trackways in the road and in the repeated pictures of a cold and turbulent ocean. And that’s the fun part. For a Language to Come also serves as a thesis for Nakahira’s complex forays in the semiotics of visual language and his existentialist idea that photography “consists only in clarifying the fact that material things are things.” A few years after For a Language to Come was published, Takahira wrote that “Extremely grainy images and intentionally unfocussed photographs in particular, have already become mere decoration.” I can think of many examples where that might be true, but Nakahira’s case, it most definitely is not. — Text : Colin Pantall

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Takuma Nakahira : Shugo Arts

Takuma Nakahira : American Suburb X

‘For a Language to Come’ – View Book : Vimeo

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01
Jul
12

Yutaka Takanashi : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (from “Toshi-e”)
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
early ’70s
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‘Miyamisuzaka, Shibuya-ku
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
1965
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Shinjuku Station, Shinjuku-ku
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
1965
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‘Untitled’ (from “Toshi-e”)
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
early ’70s
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Buffet Toyota, 1 Tsunohazu, Shinjuku-ku
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
1965
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‘Untitled’ (from “Toshi-e”)
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
early ’70s
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Korakuen Baseball Stadium, Bunkyo-ku
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
1965
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The Beatles, Marunouchi Shochiku Theatre, Chidyoda-ku
Yutaka Takanashi
Photograph
1965
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Takanashi was one of the founding members of the short-lived avant-garde group Provoke, known for their grainy, blurry black and white aesthetic, and those pictures, like that of the other “Provoke” artists of the time, were grainy in the extreme, poised between carefree and careless, and without any focus. In contrast to the “Tokyoites” photos, the images were generally long distant scenes, landscapes in a way. The angles are skewed, sharpness definitely a bourgeois concept. You got the feeling they were taken out in the country, from speeding cars, no doubt traveling “towards the city”. X

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Yutaka Takanashi : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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21
Jan
12

Jehsong Baak : Photography Series

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“Nothing is more abstract than reality.” –  Giorgio Morandi

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‘Night after Night’ Series
Jehsong Baak
Photograph
1998-2010
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‘Mendes Gans’ Series
Jehsong Baak
Photograph
2008
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‘Mendes Gans’ Series
Jehsong Baak
Photograph
2008
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‘Shelter’ Series
Jehsong Baak
Photograph
1987-1990
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‘La ou Ailleurs’ Series
Jehsong Baak
Photograph
2006
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‘Shelter’ Series
Jehsong Baak
Photograph
1987-1990
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‘Shelter’ Series
Jehsong Baak
Photograph
1987-1990
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Baak freely acknowledges that Robert Frank and Joself Koudelka have served as inspirational mentors in his work. The parallels in the lives of these three photographers are striking as are the basic themes of their work. Yet Baak maintains his own visual language and context that is complex and poignant, creating a personal path so that his work serves as confessions and insights into his persona and life.

The continuity of his photographs and his aesthetic impact are best described as Caravaggesque chiaroscuro. The eerie and surreal prints are of high contrast and a grainy black and white, a result of photographing at night in stark and desolate places. The subjects in these photographs are friends, intimates, and subjects encountered in daily life. Whether the figure is a man or woman, boy or girl, his photographs evoke the feeling of a self-portrait, irrespective of the difference in subject, time or locale.

Baak’s photographs break the stereotype and generalization that photography is a reflection of reality. his photographs reflect his past and present, memories and emotions as if he’s on an endless voyage and his photography is a way to trace his path. While many photographers are engrossed with or attempt to capture too many thoughts and ideas instead of seeing and feeling what subjects are actually at their disposal, it’s refreshing to marvel at his ability to be intuitive and spontaneous. – [Bio]

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Jehsong Baak : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
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