Posts Tagged ‘glass

11
Mar
12

Sabine Hornig : ‘Windows’ Series (Photography)

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From the inception of her work in the late 1990s, Sabine Horning has engaged in exploring specific spatial and perspectival concerns and the blurring of the distinctions between two-dimensional and three-dimensional space. Employing photography and sculpture in equal measure throughout her practice, Hornig supports and expands each of these mediums by cross-referencing one with the other.

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‘Radically Reduce’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 183 cm
2004
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‘No. 9’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 189 cm
2007
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‘No. 10’
C-print on Perspex
130 x 177 cm
2007
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‘Kleines Fenster’
C-print on Glass
80 x 116 cm
2009
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‘No. 12’
C-print on Glass
115 x 142 cm
2009
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‘No. 11’
C-print on Perspex
150 x 200 cm
2007
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‘Window with No Floor’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 195 cm
2006
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For Sabine Hornig, the window represents a basic, transparent, grid-like system that incorporates her ideas on the gaze, view and perspective, which oscillate between image and sculpture. Hornig finds the windows she uses in her photographs incidentally in modern cities, mostly in Berlin. Intentionally made visible or invisible, the window functions as a prevalent frame that contains certain flows, a certain motility between interior and exterior, public and private, transparency and distortion, open and closed space, and associated with this last pairing of terms, flight and confinement.

Through her activity of foregrounding the transparency (rather than the transparentness) of the palimpsestual threshold of the glass/window in her photographs, Hornig obliges us to become aware of glass (by means of Plexiglas) as a complex structure, a responsive surface and the window as a doubling boundary. In her recent suite of photographs of vacant shop windows, the artist not only expands on our awareness of the optics of the window as a sill, but raises these abandoned commercial spaces from their state of quiescent limbo to places where, in their emptiness, we are given reign to imagine past identity and future existence, where our emotions swing between melancholy and hope in the face of our ever-changing, mutant cities. – [Press Release: ‘Landscape Negative’ 2007]

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Sabine Hornig : Website

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18
Feb
12

Jef Van den Houte : Architectural Photography

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‘Symmetry’
Jef Van den Houte
Photograph
Brussels
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‘Kranhaus VII’
Jef Van den Houte
Photograph
Köln
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‘Kranhaus X’
Jef Van den Houte
Photograph
Köln
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‘Kranhaus VI’
Jef Van den Houte
Photograph
Köln
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‘Kranhaus IV’
Jef Van den Houte
Photograph
Köln
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‘Upwards 2’
Jef Van den Houte
Photograph
Rotterdam
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‘Meeting of Shapes’
Jef Van den Houte
Photograph
Rotterdam
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“I’ve been a passionate amateur photographer since the end of the 70s. I’m an open minded photographer and try to appreciate more traditional fine art photography as well as modern and more experimental works. In my own work my favourite topics are urban/architecture…” – Jef Van den Houte

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Jef Van den Houte : Portfolio

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01
Feb
12

Alisdair Miller : ‘Urban’ Series (Photography)

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‘Arrival’
Alisdair Miller
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Alisdair Miller
Photograph
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‘Amongst Giants’
Alisdair Miller
Photograph
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‘Infinity’
Alisdair Miller
Photograph
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‘The Bridge’
Alisdair Miller
Photograph
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‘Modernity’
Alisdair Miller
Photograph
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‘New Light’
Alisdair Miller
Photograph
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Alisdair Miller : Website

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28
Jan
12

Ernst Haas : Colour Photography

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“I never really wanted to be a photographer. It slowly grew out of the compromise of a boy who desired to combine two goals — explorer or painter. I wanted to travel, see and experience. What better profession could there be than the one of a photographer, almost a painter in a hurry, overwhelmed by too many constantly changing impressions? But all my inspirational influences came much more from all the arts than from photo magazines.” – Ernst Haas

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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1981’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1961’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘America, 1962’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1975’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1975’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘America, 1956’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1952’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘Utah, 1969’
Colour Photography
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Haas’s frustration with the limitations of technology pushed him at every turn to be slightly ahead of his time. He was a technological pioneer with the eye of a painter and the soul of a poet. It has been written that before Haas there was no color photography, only colored photographs. Haas’s first color essay was on New York, the city he would ultimately make his home. When the editors of LIFE magazine saw it, they gave it an unheard-of layout of 24 pages and called it “Magic Images of a City”.

Essays on Paris and Venice followed. Ten years later, when the Museum of Modern Art held their first color retrospective, it was the work of Haas they chose to feature. Though a Magnum photographer in the heyday of photojournalism, Haas was not interested in color as reportage. He was interested in the super-reality of dreams. To achieve this he gave commonplace objects and silhouettes new meaning. A reflection brought home the hidden depths underlying a conventional urban storefront; torn posters peeling off buildings shaped themselves into an art gallery. In his quest to produce feelings, he introduced hues and tones never before seen in printed color. And at all times his work was informed and enlightened by a guiding intelligence capable of great and quizzical humor. – [Essay by Inge Bondi]

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Ernst Haas : Website

Ernst Haas : Getty Images

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29
Oct
11

Krystina Stimakovits : ‘Thresholds’ (Photography Book)

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From the Series : Inside Out 14

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From the Series : Inside Out 01

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From the Series : Inside Out 07

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From the Series : Glimpsed 13

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From the Series : Inside-Out 02

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What is it within the life-less fragments of our physical environment that either stirs our psyche or leaves us indifferent? Is it the underlying patterns of geometric lines and forms as Kandinsky’s theories might suggest? Or is it the angle of fleeting light falling upon surfaces? Alternatively, is it simply whether or not objects and textures depicted manage to catalyse in us significant memories, however sub-conscious? It is these questions which led the photographer to hone in on the layered in-between worlds that materials such as fencing and glass often provide and, in doing so, explore the degree to which ‘straight’ photography may be able to reveal or metamorphose any of their evocative powers.

‘Thresholds’ contains ’38’ photographs chosen from several projects all of which involve glass. Although many months have passed since their beginnings, answers to these questions continue to elude her.

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Thresholds : Book Preview

Krystina Stimakovits : Website

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25
Sep
11

Reinoud Oudshoorn : Sculptures

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“A sculpture must generate more space than it consumes”

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Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
size unknown
2008

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
85 x 90 x 17 cm
2008

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
65 x 87 x 17 cm
2005

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
72 x 93 x 18 cm
1999

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
72 x 93 x 18 cm
1999

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
70 x 49 x 19 cm
2003

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
103 x 46 x 29 cm
1996

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Reinoud Oudshoorn takes the perspective of the illusory language in painting and applies it to his sculptures. He creates a bridge between the spatial illusion of the flat surface and the concrete reality of the three-dimensional sculpture. [Extract : Introduction]

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Reinoud Oudshoorn : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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