Posts Tagged ‘fragile

14
Jul
13

Robert Adams :: Photography

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Are there affirmable days or places in our deteriorating world? Are there scenes in life, right now, for which we might conceivably be thankful? Is there a basis for joy or serenity, even if felt only occasionally? Are there grounds now and then for an unironic smile?” ~ Robert Adams

For four decades Adams has photographed the changing landscape of the American West, finding there a fragile beauty that endures despite our troubled relationship with nature, and with ourselves. His photos are distinguished not only by their economy and lucidity, but also by their mixture of grief and hope. [Ext]

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‘Colorado Springs, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘A backyard, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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Robert-Adams-83

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‘The New West series’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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pikespeak-web

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‘Pikes Peak, Colorado Springs’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1979
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‘Eden, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1976-1982
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‘Untitled’
Robert Adams
photograph
1978
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Robert Adams was born in New Jersey in 1937. He was a professor of English literature for several years before turning his full attention to photography in the mid 1970s. His work is largely concerned with moments of regional transition: the suburbanization of Denver, a changing Los Angeles of the 1970s and 1980s, and the clear-cutting in Oregon in the 1990s. His many books, well-known to those concerned with the American Landscape, include The New West, From the Missouri West, Summer Nights, Los Angeles Spring, To Make It Home, Listening to the River, West From the Columbia, What We Bought, Notes for Friends, California, Summer Nights, Walking, What Can We Believe Where? and The Place We Live. [Ext]

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Robert Adams :: The Place We Live

Robert Adams :: Fraenkel Gallery

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23
Aug
12

antonia low : “gewicht des sehens” installation (on paper)

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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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The exhibition pavillion designed by the Irish artist Stephen Craig is set inside an old factory building. The floor of the pavillion is covered entirely with mirror glass and a black spray-painted scaffolding is installed on top of the fragile surface. The modernistic architecture of the building, which refers to Mies van de Rohe‘s pavillion, is reflected in the floor. The visitiors can see themselves, the space from the top of the scaffolding structure and observe the entire space in a completely different way. But through the installation and with each movement of the spectators the weight of the structure cause a continous destruction of the mirror surface. A few scaffolding elements are even thrown over onto the cracking glass while other elements remain either partly constructed or partly deconstructed in the space. Seeing their own reflections the spectators become aware of themselves, they see the caused damage and realise that the perfection was gone instantly, or had never even been achieved. [Extract]

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Antonia Low : Website

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10
Mar
12

Annie Woodford : Ceramics

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‘Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere’

Blaise Pascal, mathematician, poet and philosopher.

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‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
46 x 12 x 12 cm
2009
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‘Silent Constrainer’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
38 x 24 x 18 cm
2008
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‘Slice’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
16 x 12 x 20 cm
2010
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‘Veiled Core’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
30 x 30 x 25 cm
2010
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‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
alternative view
2009
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‘Splinter 1’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
2009
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‘Splinter 1’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
Detail, 2009
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Artist Statement

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Intrigued by the tenuous connection between past, present and future and the shadowy, illusive meaning of time, Annie Woodford makes work that is both haunting and enigmatic. Shifting boundaries between science and metaphysics and an enduring interest in parallel universe theory instill the pieces with a heightened intensity, whilst an obsession with hidden worlds has prompted her investigations into microscopy and the nano universe – making the unseen seen. Captivated by the natural world and our mysterious, infinite universe – whether seen at macroscopic or microscopic levels – she finds them the source of endless fascination and wonder.

Mankind’s place within that universe and the dichotomy between our wish for progress and our proclivity for self-destruction, has become a central theme. A passion for frozen environments and the message they embrace, not only from the past but also for the future of our planet has resulted in research trips to the Arctic and Iceland and a detailed study of the coldest place on Earth – Antarctica. The work has qualities that reflect the intricacies of the natural world, elements that highlight its beauty and transience. Fragile, complex and esoteric, delicately balanced between risk and control, Annie’s pieces float and oscillate between absence and presence, hovering silently in a place between.

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Annie Woodford : Website

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04
Feb
12

Mary Christiansen : ‘Multi Plate Etchings’ (Prints)

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‘Himmerland’
multi-plate etching
107 x 107 cm
2008
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‘Untitled 2’
multi-plate etching
16.5 x 18.5 cm
2008
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‘Shadow line’
multi-plate etching
15.5 x 16.5 cm
2008
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‘Tilt’
multi-plate etching
19.5 x 20 cm
2008
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‘Untitled’
multi-plate etching
18 x 20 cm
2007
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‘Untitled’
multi-plate etching
15.5 x 17 cm
2007
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My pre-occupation as an artist is with creating highly distilled, contemplative nuances of feeling in print. I aim to compose images – drawn from nature and memory – of stark yet tactile forms, held momentarily out of balance; forms disappearing into immaterial shadows and configurations of form in spatial settings, undergoing transformation. I’m fascinated by forms appearing like projections onto surfaces, fragile and immaterial articulations, punctuated by the interplay of light and shade. Re-discovering delicate forms in space at distances defined by rhythm and structure, are of interest to me.

My objective is to create a state of suspension of individual elements, caught in a complex of layers with deceptive simplicity. The creation of these images is intuitive in nature. The creative process is ongoing, with every intuition, reflection and configuration, pre-figuring another possibility. The printing process is an integral part of my working process. The separation and building up of layers, multiple overprinting, the use of inks of differing viscosities – these modifications inform the work as it evolves. The tactile qualities of print-making, the depth and richness of surface, are crucial. – [Artists Statement]

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Mary Christiansen : Hughson Gallery

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03
Dec
11

Bohnchang Koo : ‘White’ Series (Photography)

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Bohnchang’s work has always dealt with impermanence, with the decay and disappearance of living things. In his recent work, Koo continues this long journey to capture the fleeting and the mortal. In these spare natural landscapes—the sea, pine needles on snow, dust on a wall, withered vines —the artist renders scenes of exquisite beauty while evoking the inexorable passage of time. [Luminous Lint]

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‘White 11’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 10’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 13’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 12’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 5’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 7’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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“Koo photographs images of the fragile and the fleeting, never the immortal, of distance and solitude, never attachment or survival. An object gets old from use, remaining indifferent to artistic intention and control, attentive only to its own unerring interior progression, which leaves its disappearing traces long after the photo has been taken, thus moving its past into the future. And thus artist and spectator, who exist outside the photo and cannot enter it, must wander as strangers. From the initial choice of subject, loss is inevitable… Destiny‘s fleeting object, disappearance and sadness of life even before life ever was, returns to silence. In this fleeting is splendor, refinement and beauty.” H Kim

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Bohnchang Koo : Website

Bohnchang Koo : Lens Culture

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08
Oct
11

Toko Shinoda : Lithographs (Prints 2)

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“The most important element is my heart, that I try to express through my body and my hands. When I take a brush in my hand, my heart searches for lines, and tries to create forms.” Toko Shinoda

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‘Tamayura’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1996

‘Simile’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1997

‘Rippling’
lithograph
15-3/4 x 11-1/4″
1983

‘Blessing’
lithograph
13-1/4 x 10-1/4″
1983

‘Snow’
lithograph
13-1/4 x 10-1/2″
1982

‘Fete’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1997

‘Maiden’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1985

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Toko zealously studied traditional calligraphy and “waka” poetry. She began teaching calligraphy, and had her first one-woman exhibition in Tokyo just before the war. During the war she tended toward abstract work, which she developed to international exhibition level over the next period. After two years’ residence in New York, in Tokyo again she turned to lithographs. She became the first female artist to collaborate with architects and with interior designers. Her versatility extended to producing textiles for theater curtains, ceramic reliefs in buildings, etchings in stainless steel for elevator decor.

[Extract : The Japan Times]

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Toko Shinoda : Castle Fine Arts

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