Posts Tagged ‘ephemeral

12
Dec
12

Kevin Kemner : “Illustro Divum di Nevada” (Photography)

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Reflecting the spontaneous and temporal quality of the condensation trails, the images are recorded with an iPhone, the camera I almost always have ready at hand. This is in opposition to the larger traditional film formats I prefer for documenting architecture and the built environment. Images have been cropped to a square format. Since the contrails usually happen for a short period around dawn almost every image was shot within sight of my home. K Kemner

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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Prior to moving to Las Vegas in 1995, the image I had of the southwestern United States was one of an endless landscape of canyons embraced by an equally endless sky of vertical cumuli. Having been raised in the Midwest this was an image formed from afar, largely through the works of iconic figures such as John Ford and Ansel Adams. On arriving here, however, I discovered an entirely other landscape not reflected in the images that I had become familiar with, a landscape of great scale and openness countered by an endlessly vacant sky; the landscape of the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts.

It is the sky of my new home, Nevada that I find most remarkable; often cloudless for weeks the Mojave sky makes one aware of subtleties in the emptiness, observant of things otherwise omitted in the tradition of classic western photography. Such are the condensation trails, threadlike clouds formed by the passage of commercial airliners that appear overhead from late fall to early spring when the air is cold and dry, a linear rather than billowing cloudscape. Having the appearance of being organized, the abstractness of the condensation trails leads one to seek hidden narratives, search for meanings as they are inscribed on and then dissipate in the sky. Introduction – “Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series

This work is part of an ongoing record of the sky above Las Vegas from 2008 to the present.

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Kevin Kemner : More Works

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22
Apr
12

Anthony McCall : Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture (Installation)

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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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Anthony McCall became known at the beginning of the 1970s for his unique light installations, the so-called solid light films. Hamburger Bahnhof is presenting the largest exhibition of his work to date. A selection of his works from the past ten years will be shown in the historic central hall of the museum. The spacious former railway station with its numerous windows will be transformed for the duration of the exhibition into a cinema space (black box), filled only with haze and veils of light.

McCall has developed a signature technique for his work: animated lines, drawn in white on black, are projected into a room filled with fine haze (originally smoke and dust) so that the two-dimensional drawings are articulated as seemingly tangible, sculptural forms in real space. The artist began this series with the influential film ‘Line Describing a Cone’ and then continued to develop the concept in installations like ‘Long Film for Four Projectors’ (1974).

Originally inspired by the filmic avant-garde, from the very beginning the artist turned cinema on its head, slowed it down, and created a fully traversable, populist space. Thus, his works exist at the borders of cinema, sculpture and drawing. The works are ephemeral, yet they seem tangible and physical. Projected horizontally through the space onto the wall, or – as in his most recent works – from the ceiling to the floor, they engulf the viewer in singular, slow-moving cones of light.

The horizontal works are still reminiscent of the viewing situation in the cinema, where the projector beam is cast lengthwise onto the screen. The vertical projections however, shine light from the ceiling and can be circumnavigated by the viewer, thus moving more fully into the sphere of sculpture. Here too, McCall uses organic, sinuous lines; many works also make direct reference to the body, as illustrated by titles like ‘Between You and I’ and ‘Meeting You Halfway’. Despite his conceptual and formal rigour, McCall always creates an open space where viewers can move around freely, interact with the works, communicate with each other or simply just stroll around. ~ Extract : Exhibition Concept

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Anthony McCall : ‘Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture’

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11
Apr
12

Lola Guerrera : ‘Nebula Humilis’ Series (Photography)

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‘salinera’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘lengua-azul’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘volcan-rojo’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘jale-naranja’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘azufre’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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Lola Guerrera : Website

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22
Feb
12

Daniel Hutchinson : Paintings

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‘Stadium North’
Oil and mylar on birch panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
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‘Stadium North’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
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‘Bandshell and Shadows’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
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‘Conifers’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
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‘Natural Amphitheatre, Parlee Brook II’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2011
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‘Natural Amphitheatre, Parlee Brook, N.B’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2011
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My paintings address the subject of performance and the different architectural typologies that influence the exchange between audience and performer. I am interested in the ways in which architecture shapes the complex phenomena associated with the performer-audience transaction. In a complimentary fashion, my paintings have been made to shape reciprocal painting-observer interaction through light responsive surfaces that engage audiences in an expression analogous to performance.

I render each oil painting with a variety of grey and black hues on drafting film mounted onto panel. The result is a near monochrome picture that largely avoids traditional modeling of light and dark in the painting; rather the image emerges where actual light is caught in the grooves and reflected from the ridges of each carefully executed brushstroke. The viewer’s movement enables light to shift across the surface, simultaneously revealing and concealing parts of the subject.

My images are constantly on the verge of disintegration, as the indeterminate movement of light over the surface plunges areas into deep, endless blackness while bringing other areas into the brilliant, hard-edged focus of reflected light. Devoid of dramatic tableaux, my works suggest meaning through connotation, metaphor and through formal composition and presentation. My paintings gain further interest from the interchange of physical/optical experience and the non-locality of their depicted virtual topologies. At issue in my two-dimensional pictures is the reconciliation they offer between our three-dimensional, corporeal world and the zero dimensions of digital space. It is my aim to render, as real and palpable, indeterminate zones of infinite possibility – monochrome paintings that are as surprisingly unfixed, ephemeral and unpredictable as performance itself. – [Statement : D Hutchinson]

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Daniel Hutchinson : Website

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29
Jan
12

Georges Rousse : ‘Site-Specific Installations’

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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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After he discovered Land Art and Malevich’s Black Square against a white field, Georges Rousse altered his relationship to photography, inventing a unique approach that shifted the relationship of painting to space. He began making installations in the types of abandoned or derelict buildings that have long held an attraction for him – creating ephemeral, one-of-a-kind artworks by transforming these sites into pictorial spaces that are visible only in his photographs.

Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas. His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, that of creating a photographic image.

In these empty spaces, Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world–his imaginary “universe.” His creation both expresses his artistic intentions and resonates with his impressions of the site, its history and its culture. Finally, this results in a photograph, a flat plane, so the shapes he paints and draws, and the volumes and architectural constructions he creates in those massive spaces seem fractured or split on different levels. His photo brings together painting, architecture, and drawing. It carves out a new space in which the artist’s fictive world becomes visible. At the heart of this questioning, his work deals with our relationship to Space and Time. [Extract : Bio]

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Georges Rousse : Website

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18
Jan
12

Magdalena Jetelová : Site-Specific Installations

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‘Iceland’ Series
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
1992
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‘Iceland’ Series
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
1992
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‘Iceland’ Series
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
1992
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‘Crossing King’s Cross’ Series
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
1996
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‘Crossing King’s Cross’ Series
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
1996
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‘Crossing King’s Cross’ Series
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
1996
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‘Crossing King’s Cross’ Series
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
1996
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Jetelová works with concrete spaces. She exposes their suppressed history and stories and tries to rehabilitate their memory. In her lit installations she uses mainly lasers. Important aspects of her creations then become ephemeral, movement, constant change; all connected by different spaces and times. Ultimately the work exists only in the form of photographs and supplementary documentation.

Work with the landscape’s memory accents the changes created by man – using illuminated lines she exposes the one-time communications structure of the landscape (e.g. ‘Crossing King’s Cross’ where she uses lights to map out the future path of a train route) as well as natural changes (i.e. the ‘Iceland Project’ where she enlists lasers to draw attention to the undersea intercontinental divide). – [ArtList]

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Magdalena Jetelova : ArtList

Magdalena Jetelova : Website

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