Posts Tagged ‘emotional

27
Jul
12

Jeremy Blake : Artworks

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“silent symmetry”
jeremy blake
2012
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“industrial prose”
jeremy blake
2012
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“industrial prose #3”
jeremy blake
2012
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“rusted reflection”
jeremy blake
2012
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“mare”
jeremy blake
2012
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“lost legend”
jeremy blake
2012
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Rhythm can be experienced both aurally and visually, and I am intrigued by this notion of visual cadence. This body of work represents a personal synthesis of these principles. The forms and tonalities in the final images are my rendering of the effects I undergo when translating these minor and major chords. I equate the emotional attributes of these chords with a subdued yet inflective element of a unified sequence. It is the evasive and ever changing element of rhythm that fascinates me, and the work is my interpretation of this delicate balance between harmony and discord: capturing the moment which causes refrain, the pause of introspection, in which the rhythms are viewed through individual terms. When viewed on a fundamental level, rhythm is innate. Specifically, when one contemplates the function of rhythm in such acts as breathing, the blinking of the eyes and the beating of the heart. In essence, the experience of rhythm is an intrinsic aspect in the experience of life. It is through the questioning and exploration of this concept that I arrived at the notion of visual cadence. This body of work is meant to explore the kaleidoscopic nature of perception where terms such as wrong or right do not apply for perception itself changes as much as the individual. ~ [Artist Statement]

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Jeremy Blake : Website

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05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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04
Jul
12

Issei Suda : Photography

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‘Untitled (Sunflower)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Girl on swing)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Clouds)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kuroishi, Aomori, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Eyes and bicycles)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kanda, Tokyo, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Woman behind flowers)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Skirt)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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Issei Suda’s complex portraits and street scenes reveal his intense interest in the mysterious side of everyday life and otherworldliness. His first notable book and exhibition ‘Fushi Kaden’ (transmission of the flower of acting style} was a series based on the fifteenth-century treatise by ‘Zeami’ on the principles of ‘No theatre.’ Suda, a devout student of Zeami, translates the treatise in photographs that return to an emotional landscape that predates the rise of cities produced on his trips to remote locations in Japan from 1971 – 1978. Often his photographs are suspended in time, either one moment too soon or too late, allowing for an unsettling effect on the viewer. His fascination continues in photographic scenes remembered from days past and preserved regardless of time. His series include people who dress up for festivals, dreamlike landscapes and studies of pattern, texture and beauty. [X]

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Issei Suda : Higher Pictures

Issei Suda : Charles A Hartman

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17
Jan
12

Stanko Abadzic : Photography

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“The faster we live, the less emotion is left in the world. The slower we live, the deeper we feel the world around us, ” he says. “I am not against globalization in general, but I am against the physical and spiritual uniformity of cities and towns being dominated by multinational corporations. Globalization turns us into passive consumers. It is not interested in our creativity or our individuality. We lose our happiness when we lose our sense of identity.” – Stanko Abadzic

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‘People Who Live in Glass Houses’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Boy on a Railing’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Berlin Series’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Fun Fair Ride’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Shadows and Beach Scene’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Adriatic Routes Series’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Berlin Series’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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One of the great ironies of globalization is that as people become more connected to technology–email, cell phones, Ipods–they often become less connected to one another. This growing rift in the social fabric has been duly noted by Croatia’s Stanko Abadzic, whose deeply humanistic photographs resonate with wistful regard for a time when people were in tune with each other spiritually and emotionally rather than electronically. This accounts for the seemingly “old- fashioned” aesthetic of his images, many of which, with their geometric composition, sensual atmosphere and telling detail, look as if they could have been made in the 1940s or earlier. [Ex : Black & White magazine’s March 2007 issue]

“The mass media bombard us with images of blood and tears, “he states.” It’s high time we showed interest in beauty and aesthetics, not just in wars and catastrophes. I still believe photography can touch people emotionally. I believe a photograph can be a testimony and a document of its time, and that it can inspire us to talk to each other and make a better world…”

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Stanko Abadzic : Website

Stanko Abadzic : Verve Gallery

Stanko Abadzic : Contemporary Works

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05
Aug
10

WOW : Interactive Multimedia Design Studio

WOW aims to create and design sensational, yet timeless work that is free from fashionable trends. Our original creative process combines art and design together, and explores collaboration that cross boundaries of categorisation. WOW leads the visual design from the elements of interactive designs. Rather than only visual design outlet. WOW is an emotional platform in which we invest all our skill, knowledge and sense of beauty

WOW Website

Wowlab : Works

06
Jul
10

Mark Rothko : Red Abstracts

Mark Rothko. Orange, Red, Orange. Oil on paper.

Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. White stripe. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. Mauve and Orange. Oil on canvas.

One of the preeminent artists of his generation, Mark Rothko is closely identified with the New York School, a circle of painters that emerged during the 1940s as a new collective voice in American art. During a career that spanned five decades, he created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting. Rothko’s work is characterized by rigorous attention to formal elements such as color, shape, balance, depth, composition, and scale; yet, he refused to consider his paintings solely in these terms. He explained:

“It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing.”

Mark Rothko Web Feature




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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