Posts Tagged ‘Edgar Martins

20
Jan
12

Edgar Martins : ‘The Time Machine’ Series (Photography)

::

::
Edgar Martins
‘The Time Machine’
Museum of Electricity
Lisbon, 2011
::

::
Edgar Martins
‘The Time Machine’
Museum of Electricity
Lisbon, 2011
::

::
Edgar Martins
‘The Time Machine’
Museum of Electricity
Lisbon, 2011
::

::
Edgar Martins
‘The Time Machine’
Museum of Electricity
Lisbon, 2011
::

::
Edgar Martins
‘The Time Machine’
Museum of Electricity
Lisbon, 2011
::

::
Edgar Martins
‘The Time Machine’
Museum of Electricity
Lisbon, 2011
::

::
Edgar Martins
‘The Time Machine’
Museum of Electricity
Lisbon, 2011
::

Edgar Martins reveals ‘The Time Machine’ a body of previously unseen works, shot between 2010 and 2011. Structured as a topographic survey of hydro-electricity generating plants in Martins’ native Portugal, The Time Machine deals with the succession of radical transformations in the Portuguese society and its traditional industries, during the 20th and 21st centuries. Working closely with the EDP Foundation, Martins gained exclusive access to 19 power plants located across the country. Many of the power stations were built in the 1970s, towards the end of António de Oliveira Salazar’s regime, a time of hopeful prospects of rapid economic growth and social change. Their purpose was to fuel the country’s expansion and propel it into a prosperous future. Forty years on, seemingly deserted, they still function, however they’re now potent reminders of the failure of the Portuguese Modernist project.

Tense with unrealized expectations, the photographs in The Time Machine capture a powerful yet visibly outdated artillery of analog machinery; deserted offices and meeting rooms; vast, sterile-looking turbine halls and control rooms, all devoid of people. The absence of beings, despite an abundance of space, means that there is often no sense of scale or direction in the works. How the technology is operated, and indeed, who operates it, remains a mystery – that is if the power stations are operational (and real) at all, a hovering question considering their pristine allure. As always with Martins, what seems to be, at a first glance, apparently bright places are, in reality, dark. Using prolonged exposure times and intensive lighting, Martins creates seemingly factitious environments: the lack of shadows, synthetic colours and surreal contrasts highlight the apparent artificiality in both, the power stations, and the act of taking photographs. The scenes are entirely static yet refer to a dynamic conception of time, one that envisions “scenarios of a retrospective future or futuristic glimpses of the past: the future as it might have been conceived fifty years ago or more” [Ex : G.Dyer]

::

Edgar Martins : Website

::

29
Sep
10

Edgar Martins : “When Light Casts no Shadow” Series.

“In reflecting on the complexity of the negotiations between estranged lives and de-territorialised worlds, one might wonder if the generic city is synonymous with the contemporary airport. Immured in temporality and suffering from a sense of historical discontinuity, the airport is the elementary expression of abstract space. It renders everyone weightless. It is the space of the uprooted and, as if to confirm the term terrain vague, in my images sky and ground collide, overlap and blur. The cloudy ambiguity of these images pulls us into a deep absence, a sliding, fleeting and powerful somewhere, where everything is indeterminate and difficult to decode, with only the lights and airport hieroglyphics to orientate us.  The juxtaposition of sign and shape echoes the overlapping of time and space, disturbing language and meaning itself.” Edgar Martins


C-type Prints : “When Light Casts no Shadow” Series : 2008

Edgar Martins was granted airside access to some of the most interesting airports in Europe. The ones he chose have had a key role in history or the history of aviation (for example the Azores, was a compulsory stop for transatlantic flights prior to 1970 and a military base in both World Wars).

Almost all his images were produced at night, using the aprons’ floodlights, moonlight, long or double exposures of between ten minutes to two hours. Some of the airports on the Azores archipelago are unique. They are amongst the very few black-tarred runways in the world, and it is the relationship between the dark tarmac and the fluorescent painted signs and runway markings that lie at the heart of some of Martins’ most arresting images.

This unusual combination allowed him to produce incredibly abstract images, with a very long depth of field and often with the use of minimal lighting. In some, sky and ground merge in darkness with only the lights and airport hieroglyphics to orient us. Yet even these are hard to decode, for whilst this is a landscape of signs that can be read by the knowledgeable – pilots and air traffic controllers, for example – it remains perplexing to the uninitiated.

There are also areas in which this complex visual language is further ruptured, as new and old markings merge, echoing the overlapping of time, space and different eras, and disturbing language and meaning itself. These juxtapositions of sign and shape and their ambiguity of meaning are central to these remarkable images. is at the heart of these remarkable images. [Extract : IPA Gallery]

Edgar Martins : Website

Edgar Martins : Saatchi Gallery

Edgar Martins Series : Minimal Exposition

The Accidental Theorist Series : Kopeikin Gallery




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

email address

Join 495 other followers