Posts Tagged ‘dreamlike

05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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02
May
12

Ben Ali Ong : Photography Series

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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Ballads of the Dead and Dreaming’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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Throughout my work I have been primarily interested in the suggestive possibilities between the images, and the open narrative I can create by juxtaposing the interior and exterior world beside each other. Portraits next to landscape, for example, and the tension between these two environments. Whilst there are reoccurring motifs and symbols that appear throughout, the importance is on mood, metaphor and emotion, and how different subjects can both carry these feelings and somehow come together, creating my own ambiguous black and white world – similar in a way to the surrealist 1920’s film noir. Birds are frequent symbols that appear throughout the work. Inspired by mythology, they assume a variety of roles. They have been symbols of power and freedom throughout the ages, and are seen to link the human world to the divine. Silhouetted birds in the cloud scape, brooding vistas, faces emerging from darkness, all come together in an attempt to produce an imaginative and mysterious landscape. Early visual influences for me have been Caravaggio and Francis Bacon, beginning with a general attraction to the darker sensibilities of each artists work and it’s sometimes macabre nature. The use of stark, direct lighting and heavy shadows in Caravaggio’s paieces, as well Bacon’s apparent painted ‘blur’ have both made their technical influences. By shooting 35mm black and white film and layering negatives together during the scanning stage, as well as the use of surface scratching and inscriptions to the negative, I try evoke a dream like detachment of an earlier age. BAO

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Ben Ali Ong : Website

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23
Jan
12

Osheen Harruthoonyan: ‘Black Garden’ Series (Photography)

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“It’s easy to lose sight of exactly who you are while passing through the ‘Black Garden’. At the start, things are clear, there’s you and there’s the land, you each have your names and the division is simple.

Yet even from a peak within Nagorno-Karabakh you’re lost in the panorama. Mountain after mountain begets valley upon valley. A singular road runs through it all and though the end is too far to make out, you trust there’s an end. In your immediate vicinity at any given time you lose yourself in the intimacy of the trees, the overgrown foliage, the tombstones of an abandoned graveyard like fossilised crevices disintegrating in the wind. Voices buried beneath the moss, and cumulative silence, whisper about war.

There are small signs of life, a singular bird, a crucifix like a question mark that would cease to be seen if not for a blinking flame between the dripping walls of a crumbling cave. As night falls, shadows cannot be deciphered from leaves. Something floats by your eye, mouches volontes, a schism in the visual fabric, produced by your mind or the air, it does not matter. Your heart beats out what colour is left of the fading day and at once you are included and excluded from the landscape…” – Amy Pagnotta

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‘Black Garden’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Black Mirror’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Swan’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
28 x 35 inches
2011
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‘Wave’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Schism’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Tree of Garni’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Mercury’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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Born in Persia and raised in Athens, Greece and Vancouver B.C., Osheen Harruthoonyan is a Toronto based photographer and filmmaker. Drawing upon his rich experiences living in such diverse cities, he employs a multi-faceted approach towards his artistic practice, investigating memory, history and the deconstructive process of time. Osheen’s work has been featured on Bravo! Arts Channel and his exhibitions in Toronto have consistently been noted as a top show not to miss. Harruthoonyan has also worked as a cinematographer on numerous short films, music videos, and experimental films.

Osheen Harruthoonyan’s sumptuous photographic prints evoke the uncertain, fledgling flashes encountered at the threshold of a dream. Combining traditional large-format photography with a variety of analog photo-manipulation techniques, Harruthoonyan skillfully renders his subjects within ethereally illusive environments. The fastidious striations and cracks of his altered film negatives become esoteric anomalies that hearken to a unique and singular “subterranean realm”.

Harruthoonyan’s willingness to take risks within the confines of the traditional photographic process makes this representational capacity possible. Altering each negative by hand, his works crystallize midway between the calculable and the spontaneous, addressing both the systematic and the chaotic. His careful yet playful inventiveness unravels the mysteries of our collective irreconcilable reverie. Harruthoonyan’s creations conjure the lifetimes that exist within moments, and the glimmers of strangeness that give pause to our ever-evolving subconscious states. Within his work, we witness not only the captured image, but the very process of image-making laid bare. – [Ex : La Petite Mort Gallery]

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Osheen Harruthoonyan : Website

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05
Apr
11

Jungjin Lee : ‘Wind’ Series (Photography)

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The images in the Wind Series represent my introspective states and thoughts. Out in the field, in the forest, or in the village, I am ready to press the shutter release when the scenery stirs my emotions and imagination. This moment of ‘absolute echo’ within myself travels through infinite time and space. That is, ‘Wind’ becomes my energy of free spirit. Vanishment and transformation. Sadness – yet another change… Wind is invisible and it contains more of inner thoughts than an actual fact or a definition. I don’t try to make my definite direction of wind in my works. That is why I like the title Wind. They are just landscape pictures…” Jungjin Lee

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’06-56′
‘wind’ series
gelatin silver print
2008

’07-106′
‘wind’ series
gelatin silver print
2008

’07-87′
‘wind’ series
gelatin silver print
2008

’07-83′
‘wind’ series
gelatin silver print
2008

’06-55′
‘wind’ series
gelatin silver print
2008

’07-72′
‘wind’ series
gelatin silver print
2008

’07-101′
‘wind’ series
gelatin silver print
2008

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Lee’s work is unique in the world of photography. She does not mechanically reproduce multiples, but creates each work by hand. She brushes liquid emulsion onto large sheets of handmade rice and mulberry papers. Her brushstrokes sweep across the soft texture of the paper and capture the photographic image, revealing a painter’s sensibility in a gestural dance. Calligraphy, an art form the artist mastered as a young child, resonates through her oeuvre.

The series was made in a wide panoramic format on gelatin silver coated Korean Hanji paper. The absorbent surface texture of the paper combined with dreamlike images of the natural world and of man’s habitation within it creates the illusion of movement – an imperceptible blur of the motion of internal landscapes transported by a breath both human and cosmic. [Extract : Bellas Artes Gallery]

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Jungjin Lee : Website

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25
Sep
10

Onur Senturk : Needles (Illustration Series)

Onur Senturk
Design, 3d, Compositing
70 x 100cm
2009

Onur Senturk
Design, 3d, Compositing
70 x 100cm
2009

Onur Senturk
Design, 3d, Compositing
70 x 100cm
2009

Onur Senturk
Design, 3d, Compositing
70 x 100cm
2009

‘Needles’ is an illustration series where “Onur Senturk” experiments with various 3d techniques to create surreal, dream like landscapes in black and white. [Extract : Onur Senturk : Behance Network]

Onur Senturk : More Works




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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