Posts Tagged ‘double exposures

19
Feb
12

Torbjørn Rødland : ‘Eighteen Analogue Double Exposures’

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‘Commissure’
Silver gelatin print
27 x 33 x 3 cm
2011
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‘Highlighters’
Silver gelatin print
27 x 33 x 3 cm
2011
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‘Troll’
Silver gelatin print
27 x 33 x 3 cm
2011
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‘Cars and Flowers’
Silver gelatin print
27 x 33 x 3 cm
2011
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‘Laurel Canyon Rooftop’
Silver gelatin print
27 x 33 x 3 cm
2011
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‘Machine Head’
Silver gelatin print
27 x 33 x 3 cm
2011
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‘Tassel’
Silver gelatin print
27 x 33 x 3 cm
2011
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SENTENCES ON PHOTOGRAPHY BY TORBJØRN RØDLAND

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1. The muteness of a photograph matters as much as its ability to speak.
2. The juxtaposition of photographs matters as much as the muteness of each.
3. All photography fattens. Objectification is inescapable.
4. It cannot secure the integrity of its subject any more than it can satisfy the need to touch or taste.
5. Good ideas are easily bungled.
6. Banal ideas can be rescued by personal investment and beautiful execution.
7. Lacking an appealing surface, a photograph should depict surfaces appealingly.
8. A photo that refuses to market anything but its own complexities is perverse. Perversion is bliss.
9. A back-lit object is a pregnant object.
10. To disregard symbols is to disregard a part of human perception.
11. Photography may employ tools and characteristics of reportage without being reportage.
12. The only photojournalistic image to remain interesting is the one that produces or evokes myths.
13. A photographer in doubt will get better results than one caught up in the freedom of irony.
14. Aesthetic eyes are distant eyes. Melancholic eyes are distant eyes. Ironic eyes are distant eyes.
15. One challenge in photography is to outdistance distance. Immersion is key.
16. Irony may be applied in homeopathic doses.
17. A lyrical photograph should be aware of its absurdity. Lyricism grows from awareness.
18. For the photographer, everyone and everything is a model, including the photograph itself.
19. The photography characterized by these sentences is informed by conceptual art.
20. The photography characterized by these sentences is not conceptual photography.

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“Sentences on Photography” was initially published in “Triple Canopy”, Issue #12: May 5, 2011

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Torbjørn Rødland : Standard (Oslo)

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25
Jan
12

Nathan Duarte : ‘Holgalactik’ Series (Double Exposures)

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“Disturbed visions through plastic lens cameras”

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“Holgalactik Spacetime”
HOLGA CFN “Panda” – Kodak BW 400 CN
Double exposure – Negative scanned
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“Holgalactik Morph-Wing”
HOLGA CFN “Panda” – Kodak Portra 400 NC
Double exposure – Negative scanned
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“Holgalactik Cruzader”
HOLGA CFN “Panda” – Kodak Portra 400 NC
Double exposure – Negative scanned
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“Holgalactik Prometheus”
HOLGA CFN “Panda” – Kodak BW 400 CN
Double exposure – Negative scanned
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“Holgalactik Intrepid”
HOLGA CFN “Panda” – Kodak BW 400 CN
Double exposure – Negative scanned
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“Holgalactik X-Plorer”
HOLGA CFN “Panda” – Ilford FP4 Plus 125
Double exposure – Negative scanned
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Nathan Duarte : Experimental Photography

Nathan Duarte : More Works

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29
Sep
10

Edgar Martins : “When Light Casts no Shadow” Series.

“In reflecting on the complexity of the negotiations between estranged lives and de-territorialised worlds, one might wonder if the generic city is synonymous with the contemporary airport. Immured in temporality and suffering from a sense of historical discontinuity, the airport is the elementary expression of abstract space. It renders everyone weightless. It is the space of the uprooted and, as if to confirm the term terrain vague, in my images sky and ground collide, overlap and blur. The cloudy ambiguity of these images pulls us into a deep absence, a sliding, fleeting and powerful somewhere, where everything is indeterminate and difficult to decode, with only the lights and airport hieroglyphics to orientate us.  The juxtaposition of sign and shape echoes the overlapping of time and space, disturbing language and meaning itself.” Edgar Martins


C-type Prints : “When Light Casts no Shadow” Series : 2008

Edgar Martins was granted airside access to some of the most interesting airports in Europe. The ones he chose have had a key role in history or the history of aviation (for example the Azores, was a compulsory stop for transatlantic flights prior to 1970 and a military base in both World Wars).

Almost all his images were produced at night, using the aprons’ floodlights, moonlight, long or double exposures of between ten minutes to two hours. Some of the airports on the Azores archipelago are unique. They are amongst the very few black-tarred runways in the world, and it is the relationship between the dark tarmac and the fluorescent painted signs and runway markings that lie at the heart of some of Martins’ most arresting images.

This unusual combination allowed him to produce incredibly abstract images, with a very long depth of field and often with the use of minimal lighting. In some, sky and ground merge in darkness with only the lights and airport hieroglyphics to orient us. Yet even these are hard to decode, for whilst this is a landscape of signs that can be read by the knowledgeable – pilots and air traffic controllers, for example – it remains perplexing to the uninitiated.

There are also areas in which this complex visual language is further ruptured, as new and old markings merge, echoing the overlapping of time, space and different eras, and disturbing language and meaning itself. These juxtapositions of sign and shape and their ambiguity of meaning are central to these remarkable images. is at the heart of these remarkable images. [Extract : IPA Gallery]

Edgar Martins : Website

Edgar Martins : Saatchi Gallery

Edgar Martins Series : Minimal Exposition

The Accidental Theorist Series : Kopeikin Gallery




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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