Posts Tagged ‘death

24
Dec
10

Chris Engman : Photography

‘Equipoise’
archival inkjet print
36″ x 48″
2005

‘Transplant’
archival inkjet print
27″ x 36″
2005

‘The Playground’
archival inkjet print
30″ x 36″
2006

‘The Consummation’
archival inkjet print
28″ x 38″
2005

‘The Library’
archival inkjet print
38″ x 27″
2005

‘The Audience’
archival inkjet print
36″ x 30″
2004

“We often say, photographs “capture” time. But to capture something is not to understand it, because in the act of capture the thing is changed. Family albums, travel photographs- what they do with time is give it boundaries. They make memory possible by giving it shape. They describe an event or a place as if in the absence of time, as if time does not exist.” Chris Engman

Much of my recent work takes place in the desert at a site in eastern Washington that I found two years ago and has by its gravity kept me going back. The place, for me, has a psychologically charged but neutral energy, like an unformed dream or empty canvas waiting to be acted upon.

For inspiration, in addition to the desert, I turn to books: epic novels, epic histories, and fiction rich in visual imagery. I especially appreciate thinkers who address the grandest of human themes, which are also my themes: grandeur and the ordinary, struggle and futility, illusion and disillusionment, meaningfulness, age, and death.

Working in the desert has come to be a form of meditation. Days are spent, sometimes with a crew but more often in solitude, wordlessly driving, carrying supplies, erecting structures and sets, and studying the slow progress of the sun overhead and its all-powerful, shape-changing, comfort giving and taking effects. My state of mind while I work can range from joy and contentedness to emptiness and doubt, and I believe these shifting emotions, intensified by an intense place, carry through into the best of my eventual photographs. (artist statement)

Chris Engman : Website

16
Dec
10

Paul Chan : The 7 Lights

Fold into itself – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 x 23 7/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Crystal into network – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 x 23 3/4 x 3/4 in
2006

Chinese roof into pyramid – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 1/8 x 23 1/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Network into line – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 x 23 3.4 x 3/4 in
2006

Circle into spiral – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
31 7/8 x 23 7/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Point into labyrinth – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
31 3/4 x 23 7/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Paul Chan’s complete series “The 7 Lights,” offers a unique occasion to explore the practice of a New York-based artist whose work engages such fundamental themes as politics, poetry, war, death, and desire. Begun in 2005, Chan’s ambitious cycle combines obsolete computer technology with hypnotic imagery to create a series of enigmatic encounters with light and darkness. In the title, the word “light” has been struck through, drawing attention to its dramatic absence.

Presented alongside a selection of works on paper, older videos, and a new projection, the Lights create a vast image of cyclical destruction and rebirth, spread across floors and walls like light falling through windows. Structured over the course of a day, each of the Lights begins peacefully, with the warm colors of dawn. Slowly the atmosphere changes: silhouettes of objects rise up through the air and are dismantled by obscure forces, while human shadows plummet towards the ground. Like a dream deteriorating into a nightmare, the sequence becomes increasingly horrific until it fades to dusk and peace returns, waiting for day to break again.

Just as a shadow cannot fully describe the object from which it emanates, “The 7 Lights” convey a narrative that is inevitably incomplete, yet rich with historical references, including ancient Greek mythology and Baroque painting. “The 7 Lights” can also be related to Biblical accounts of the origin of the world and its impending end, suggesting a possible reading of Chan’s cycle as an allegory of the seven days of creation. Furthermore, Chan’s work calls to mind contemporary tragedies such as 9/11, the war in Iraq, and the ongoing eruptions of terrorist violence around the globe. Unfolding like a present-day Last Judgment, a subjective and anonymous hand decides what rises and what falls; touching on the viewer’s own fears, the result is not as one might have imagined – worthless objects ascend while human life is cast aside like rainfall. However, caught as they are in an endless repetition, the Lights suggest that perhaps there is no end, just an eternal beginning. [Extract : New Museum]

Paul Chan : Video Projections

Paul Chan : Drawings

Paul Chan : Audio

Paul Chan : Text

27
Nov
10

Fernell Franco : ‘Amarrados’ (Bound)

Fernell Franco
‘untitled’
‘Amarrados’ (Bound) series
gelatin silver print

Fernell Franco
‘untitled’
‘Amarrados’ (Bound) series
gelatin silver print

Fernell Franco
‘untitled’
‘Amarrados’ (Bound) series
gelatin silver print

Fernell Franco
‘untitled’
‘Amarrados’ (Bound) series
gelatin silver print

Fernell Franco
‘untitled’
‘Amarrados’ (Bound) series
gelatin silver print

Fernell Franco
‘untitled’
‘Amarrados’ (Bound) series
gelatin silver print

Fernell Franco (1942-2006) is considered one of the few photographers who developed a distinct lyrical view of the shift toward modernity in Latin America. The exhibition ‘Amarrados’ [Bound] focused on the Amarrados series comprising large-scale black and white photographs developed by Franco in the early 1980s. ‘Amarrados’ [Bound] was the first solo exhibition devoted to the artist in the United States.

It featured twenty vintage prints and a number of preparatory studies that Franco produced in order to create the series. He conceived his photographs in street markets in Colombia and other Latin American countries from the 1980s onwards, featuring wrapped up devices and isolated inanimate objects typically used by informal vendors to protect their merchandise. His images are devoid of human presence, conveying death, solitude, violence, abandonment, and mystery. [Americas Society]

Fernell Franco : Website – Series




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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