Posts Tagged ‘cutouts

17
Feb
12

Arnold Newman : ‘Early Works’ (Photography)

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“We do not take pictures with our cameras, but with our hearts and minds.” -Arnold Newman

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‘Sink Cutout’
West Palm Beach FL
Arnold Newman
1941
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‘One Way’
West Palm Beach FL
Arnold Newman
1941
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‘Ironing Board Cutout’
West Palm Beach FL
Arnold Newman
1941
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‘Railroad Sign’
West Palm Beach FL
Arnold Newman
1941
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‘Clapboard House Montage’
West Palm Beach FL
Arnold Newman
1941
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‘Chairs On Porch’
West Palm Beach FL
Arnold Newman
1941
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“As for myself, I work the way I do because of the kind of person that I am – my work is an expression of myself. It reflects me, my fascination with people, the physical world around us, and the exciting medium in which I work. I do not claim that my way is the best or the only way, it is simply my way. It is an expression of myself, of the way I think and feel.” – Arnold Newman

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The Arnold Newman Archive

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06
Jul
10

Ben Nicholson : A Continuous Line

1945 (Still Life) (1945)
Oil and pencil on canvas
14 x 23 1/2 inches 35.6 x 61 cm

Painting (Florentine Ballet) (1934)
Oil on canvas
14 x 24 inches (35.5 x 61 cm)

1934 (act drop curtain for Beethoven 7th symphony ballet)
Oil and pencil on board
9 x 10 1/4 inches (22.8 x 26.2 cm)

1940 (Two Forms) (1940)
Oil on board
9 x 8 7/8 inches (22.8 x 22.5 cm)

1945 (design for an act drop)
Lithograph
21 x 37 cm (image)

Painting (gouache) (1941)
Gouache
8 7/8 x 19 inches (22.5 x 48.3 cm)

Ben Nicholson is best known as a leading figure of the Modern Movement in Britain in the 1930s. His abstract paintings and reliefs secured his reputation alongside such international collaborators as Dutch painter Piet Mondrian and Russian sculptor Naum Gabo. A Continuous Line looks at Nicholson’s work from the beginning of his mature career in the early 1920s to 1958 when the artist left Britain for Switzerland. In contrast to previous exhibitions, it pays special attention to his non-abstract work of the 1920s, 1940s and 1950s, speculating on differing ideas of the modern in painting. In the wake of the first world war and during the second world war, Nicholson’s art proposed a new way of thinking about the world, including a re-engagement with nature and tradition. This can be seen in his landscapes of this time and in his gently worked surface textures, which might be seen as modern in more subtle ways than his more obviously radical abstracts. [extract : A Continuous Line : Tate]

Ben Nicholson Web Feature : A Continuous Line




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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By Azurebumble

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