Posts Tagged ‘complex

05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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23
Apr
12

Azurebumble : ‘AI : Series’ (Photography Book)

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Recently, I’ve curated a number of image series by photographers from ‘Flickr’ on my blog ‘Aesthetic Investigations’. Subsequently, I thought it would be interesting to document these works in a book. Therefore, i’ve arranged a collection of ’39’ abstract and minimal photographic series by these ’32’ artists. A selection of pages from the book can be viewed below, a full book preview can be seen: HERE

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Thank you to everyone who contributed their images to this project.

All graphic content and curations by : Alan Wilson ( azurebumble )

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Book Cover
Front & Back Pages
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Introductory Pages
Copyright & Contents
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Introductory Pages
Tags, Artists & Series Thumbnails
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Photography Series
Gianni Galassi
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Photography Series
Teresa (Colourful Life) & roB_meL
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Photography Series
Camilo Todemann & Olli Kekäläinen
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Photography Series
Brancolina & Barbara Stumm
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Photography Series
Françoise Lucas & Leonie Polah
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Photography Series
Julian Gomez & Tom Mclaughlan
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Artists

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Alec Cheer……………………Annemie Hiele……………………..Azurebumble……………………Barbara Stumm

Brancolina………………….Camilo Todemann…………………..Daniel Molina…………………….Fernandoprats

Françoise Lucas…………….Gianni Galassi…………………….James Withey……………….John Kosmopoulos

Julian Gomez……………Krystina Stimakovits…………………Leonie Polah………………………….Lillykeeper

Lord Jezzer…………………..Lucie Bourassa…………………..Mark Valentine…………………..Olli Kekäläinen

Peter Moons…………………..Phédia Mazuc……………………..Rita Vita Finzi…………………………….roB_meL

Shari Baker……………………Steffen Tuck………………..Teresa (Colourful life)…………..Tom McLaughlan

Visualisarium…………………..Wilma Eras……………………Wouter Hogendorp……………………….Zel Nunes

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VIEW FULL BOOK PREVIEW AND PURCHASE HERE

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10
Mar
12

Annie Woodford : Ceramics

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‘Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere’

Blaise Pascal, mathematician, poet and philosopher.

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‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
46 x 12 x 12 cm
2009
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‘Silent Constrainer’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
38 x 24 x 18 cm
2008
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‘Slice’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
16 x 12 x 20 cm
2010
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‘Veiled Core’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
30 x 30 x 25 cm
2010
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‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
alternative view
2009
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‘Splinter 1’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
2009
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‘Splinter 1’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
Detail, 2009
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Artist Statement

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Intrigued by the tenuous connection between past, present and future and the shadowy, illusive meaning of time, Annie Woodford makes work that is both haunting and enigmatic. Shifting boundaries between science and metaphysics and an enduring interest in parallel universe theory instill the pieces with a heightened intensity, whilst an obsession with hidden worlds has prompted her investigations into microscopy and the nano universe – making the unseen seen. Captivated by the natural world and our mysterious, infinite universe – whether seen at macroscopic or microscopic levels – she finds them the source of endless fascination and wonder.

Mankind’s place within that universe and the dichotomy between our wish for progress and our proclivity for self-destruction, has become a central theme. A passion for frozen environments and the message they embrace, not only from the past but also for the future of our planet has resulted in research trips to the Arctic and Iceland and a detailed study of the coldest place on Earth – Antarctica. The work has qualities that reflect the intricacies of the natural world, elements that highlight its beauty and transience. Fragile, complex and esoteric, delicately balanced between risk and control, Annie’s pieces float and oscillate between absence and presence, hovering silently in a place between.

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Annie Woodford : Website

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13
Dec
11

Lee Friedlander : Photography (Sequence 1)

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Friedlander began photographing the American social landscape in 1948. His photographs bring to the surface the juxtapositions of everyday life that comprise our modern world. Beyond the vigorous outward eye he turns to the world around him, Lee is also recognized for his investigation of the self.

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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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Lee Friedlander is internationally recognized as one of America’s most important contemporary photographers. In the 1960’s his silver print photographs, described as “open-ended alternatives to normal seeing,” provided a shockingly new aesthetic of asymmetrical and fragmented images of the United States. Lacking defined borders and layered with a disjointed profusion of architectural and advertising elements, his photographs were visually equivalent to the broken, improvisational rhythms of jazz. Working within the tradition of Eugene Atget, Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand, and Robert Frank, Lee was one of the first modern photographers to portray the “social landscape” of America as a complex mixture of order and chaos, warmth and alienation, refinement, and commercialism. [Extract]

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Lee Friedlander : Atget Photography

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13
Dec
11

Lee Friedlander : Photography (Sequence 2)

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Friedlander often included oblique references to himself by including his own reflection or shadow in the photographs. – “I suspect it’s for one’s self-interest that one looks at one’s surroundings and one’s self. This search is personally borne and is indeed my reason and motive for making photographs.”

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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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Lee Friedlander’s unique vision underscores the two-dimensionality of the picture plane and the potential for photographs to contain varying levels of reflection, opacity, and transparency. Like Atget’s photographs, Friedlander’s images of shop windows evoke a certain ambiguity, an oscillation between reflected and actual reality, that invite inspection of the space and the meaning of the image. Similar responses are encouraged by Friedlander’s street photographs, in which shadows of figures (usually Friedlander himself) and other subjects overlap in the photographic image. The projected outline of Friedlander’s body as within the picture frame implies the notion that the photographer can be both behind the camera and in front of it. Interpreted further, Friedlander’s shadow can be taken to represent the imposition of the photographer upon his world and his subject. [Extract : MoCP]

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Lee Friedlander : MoMA

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07
Nov
11

Semiconductor : 20 Hz (Motion Graphics)

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A Semiconductor work by Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt.

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20 Hz observes a geo-magnetic storm occurring in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Working with data collected from the CARISMA radio array and interpreted as audio, we hear tweeting and rumbles caused by incoming solar wind, captured at the frequency of 20 Hertz. Generated directly by the sound, tangible and sculptural forms emerge suggestive of scientific visualisations. As different frequencies interact both visually and aurally, complex patterns emerge to create interference phenomena that probe the limits of our perception. Made for ‘Invisible Fields’ at Arts Santa Monica in Barcelona : Here

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Semiconductor Films

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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