Posts Tagged ‘city

30
Aug
12

Bertrand Fleuret : “Landmasses and Railways” (Photo Book)

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“I am alone. Walking at random. Wandering, as if at random, among the unrecognizable fragments of what were palatial homes, public buildings, private residences, gaming houses and houses of prostitution, theatres, temples, and fountains. I am looking for something”. – Alain Robbe-Grillet

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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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“Landmasses and Railways”
Bertrand Fleuret
Photographs
2009
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Bertrand Fleuret’s ‘Landmasses and Railways’ is a photographic travelogue to our interior, or perhaps an exploration outwards, to the encircling spheres above. Divided into five sections – I. The Melancholy of Departure, II. Approaching the City, III. Inside The Walls, IV. An Empty Building, and V. The Garden – the book takes us on a winding journey through a strange but familiar world. No time for questions. We quickly crash down into the ocean. Past the swarming jellyfish, we scramble for land, gasping for breath before safely making it ashore. From our initial descent, Fleuret takes us on a bewildering journey to the city, through its modern ruins and back to the primal undergrowth of the garden. Shooting in impressionistic black and white, Fleuret has the eye of a harried detective or alien cartographer. Remapping and exploring the world, Fleuret gathers fragments that cohere and then break apart. Is that a distant heavenly body or a glowing ball of trash? Drawing inspiration from such sources as the cosmic jazz musician Sun Ra, Chris Marker’s San Soleil, the novels of Alain Robbe-Grillet and Solaris, Fleuret’s book is a retro-futuristic travelogue as told by a bastard child of Provoke. – Extract : Adam Bell

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Bertrand Fleuret : Website

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30
Jul
12

Daido Moriyama : Photography Series

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“For me, photography is not a means by which to create beautiful art,
but a unique way of encountering genuine reality” ~ Daido Moriyama

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“Record No.15”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Record No.15”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Record No.18”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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Daido Moriyama (b.1938, Osaka) is one of Japan’s leading figures in photography. Witness to the spectacular changes that transformed post WWII Japan, his black and white photographs express a fascination with the cultural contradictions of age-old traditions that persist within modern society. Providing a harsh, crude vision of city life and the chaos of everyday existence, strange worlds, and unusual characters, his work occupies a unique space between the objective and the subjective, the illusory and the real. Moriyama’s use of a small hand held automatic camera gives his images a loose and casual aesthetic, undermined by a forceful and decisive point of view. – Extract : Luhring Augustine

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Daido Moriyama : Website

Daido Moriyama : Luhring Augustine

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29
Jun
12

René Burri : ‘Blackout Series’ (Photography)

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‘Blackout Series’
Gelatin silver print
05.11.1965
New York
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‘Blackout Series’
Gelatin silver print
05.11.1965
New York
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‘Blackout Series’
Gelatin silver print
05.11.1965
New York
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‘Blackout Series’
Gelatin silver print
05.11.1965
New York
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‘Blackout Series’
Gelatin silver print
05.11.1965
New York
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‘Blackout Series’
Gelatin silver print
05.11.1965
New York
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‘Blackout Series’
Gelatin silver print
05.11.1965
New York
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Thanks to the ever-increasing amounts of artificial light that floods our cities, photographers such as Brassai, Weegee, and Saul Leiter, along with many others, have chosen the night as their subject matter. But on November 5, 1965, Swiss photographer Rene Burri had nighttime thrust upon him. Burri was in New York City when the incident now called the Northeast Blackout of 1965 brought down power in New York City. He was in the city working on film he had shot in China when the power failed around 5:30 pm. With eight roles of film in his pockets, he walked Fifth Avenue between 59th and 42nd streets, producing what turned out to be forty printable images. The images in Blackout New York, depict a strangely calm city. Admittedly, he wasn’t on some of New York’s meaner streets, but the mood Burri captured of the cooperation and resourcefulness is said to have been the rule throughout the city.

Headlights illuminate the streets, and people have left their apartments with flashlights and candles or improvised torches from rolled up newspapers. In some images, and these are among the best, the blackness is merely pockmarked with pools of light. Elsewhere Burri found customers seated at a diner’s candlelit counter or sharing flashlights while checking to see if the payphones were working. People squeezed onto overcrowded buses look somewhat like refugees, but that is really as grim as it gets. In a more definitive image, the image that closes the book, four women stand in the street, silhouetted by oncoming traffic, optimistically awaiting an empty cab. In this slender document of what in the long run was a minor incident, Burri captured some of the best traits of the city during the unusual circumstances he happened to find himself in… ~ [ Charles Dee Mitchell – Photo Eye Magazine ]

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René Burri : Flo Peters Gallery

René Burri : Magnum Photos

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29
Apr
12

Gail Albert Halaban : ‘Out My Window’ Series (Photography)

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Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Rear Window’ comes readily to mind when you look at Gail Albert Halaban’s large color photographs. Most depict tall New York apartment buildings viewed from a high window opposite.

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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Gail Albert Halaban
‘Out My Window’ Series
Photograph
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Initially, these images resemble formal studies in which architectural grids create syncopating, all-over visual rhythms. Then you notice that there are people in some of the apartments. None of them are doing anything exciting. There is no sex or violence. But there is something compelling about being able to see into the private worlds of ordinary people. The voyeuristic, slightly melancholy effect recalls certain paintings by Edward Hopper. Halaban also took pictures of people while in their apartments with them, and these have a poignant intimacy. They resemble photographs by Philip-Lorca diCorcia. One breathtaking example shows a woman wrapped in a bath towel sitting on the edge of her bathtub and gazing out through glass walls over the city. While the photographs shot from distant windows suggest a kind of surveillance, in fact the artist collaborated with her subjects and asked them to pose and position themselves in their homes for the camera. So they are a form of portraiture. Scale is important too. Because the people are so tiny in proportion to the whole picture, there is an expansive effect. And for the same reason, there is a sense of social amplitude: so many buildings, so many people, so many stories in the big city.. ~ [ Extract : The New York Times – Art in Review – Ken Johnson ]

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Gail Albert Halaban : Website

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28
Feb
12

F.X. Combes : ‘Building Series’ (Screen Capture Photographs)

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The portrayal of urban space is at the heart of FX Combes’ work. His series ‘Buildings’, continues along these lines. How do you portray the City? The City in its ultimate truth, bare, naked. According to the artist, by starting with the ordinariness of the basic building in mind. With the most traditional vision, the least cluttered possible, of a building garnered in a few basic lines. Then, this ordinariness is reorganized, structured, given shape and colour, assigned order, rhythm and meaning, and restored in the layers of a fixed time – past, present, and future piled together. In a way that the urban concept in itself emerges from the raw material; The purest, and most refined City from the concrete building…

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‘untitled – buildings series’
inkjet print on textured paper
140 x 120 cm
2009
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‘untitled – buildings series’
inkjet print on textured paper
140 x 120 cm
2009
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‘untitled – buildings series’
inkjet print on textured paper
140 x 120 cm
2009
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‘untitled – buildings series’
inkjet print on textured paper
140 x 120 cm
2009
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‘untitled – buildings series’
inkjet print on textured paper
140 x 120 cm
2009
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‘untitled – buildings series’
inkjet print on textured paper
140 x 120 cm
2009
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In practice, F.X. Combes begins by taking photos of buildings, that he then photographs again through the screen of his computer, in order to attain the desired distance between what is real and what is suggested without using photo retouching software. In this way, he obtains a series of nearly identical pictures of the same pattern, nearly being the key word. These successive screen captures create each time micro differences in shape, the tiniest shifts in light. And, as a result, there are so many occurrences of the unpredictable that the artist then takes great care to systematize either through a process of multiplication – juxtaposition of the images (the horizontal series) or through a process of reconstruction using a fragment, an imaginary building or an ideal City (the vertical series).

Actually, what is the building really behind its undecipherable facade, its impenetrable walls and blind windows? What is the City in its intimate nature and beyond its immediate materialisation? Originally it was the foremost human meeting place. Man built the city to live there, to thrive and prosper there. But in its arrogant proliferation the city ended up rejecting man into an anonymity that is a form of denial. The realisation of this presence/absence of man in the city that he himself made is one of the issues that is at stake in these images. The City according to FX Combes is most certainly an inhabited place but by a being who, after having left a sign of his time spent there, finds himself from then on in the process of fading out completely.

This bluish trembling, this nearly vibrating halo that enshrouds the buildings rising into their metaphysical sky – each of these effects is evidence of this gradual disappearance, this evanescence in progress. The succession of layers of the present and of past generations who lived there is still visible, virtually through chance circumstances that are less and less discernible, but the City has already transformed into another condition of its own location. Beyond the man who made it, the City remains and endures, and pulls itself up to the pinnacle of its definitive self. The City approaches more and more surely the ideal of Platonism. Underneath the deceptive ordinariness of buildings, the fundamental archetype is revealed. – [Extract : from press release by Vincent Gracy – NextLevel Galerie]

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F.X. Combes : Website

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24
Feb
12

Quentin De Briey & Niki Waltl for Asvoff

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Track : ‘Take Five’ – Dave Brubeck & John Coltrane

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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