Posts Tagged ‘C-print

23
Aug
12

antonia low : “gewicht des sehens” installation (on paper)

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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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The exhibition pavillion designed by the Irish artist Stephen Craig is set inside an old factory building. The floor of the pavillion is covered entirely with mirror glass and a black spray-painted scaffolding is installed on top of the fragile surface. The modernistic architecture of the building, which refers to Mies van de Rohe‘s pavillion, is reflected in the floor. The visitiors can see themselves, the space from the top of the scaffolding structure and observe the entire space in a completely different way. But through the installation and with each movement of the spectators the weight of the structure cause a continous destruction of the mirror surface. A few scaffolding elements are even thrown over onto the cracking glass while other elements remain either partly constructed or partly deconstructed in the space. Seeing their own reflections the spectators become aware of themselves, they see the caused damage and realise that the perfection was gone instantly, or had never even been achieved. [Extract]

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Antonia Low : Website

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11
Mar
12

Sabine Hornig : ‘Windows’ Series (Photography)

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From the inception of her work in the late 1990s, Sabine Horning has engaged in exploring specific spatial and perspectival concerns and the blurring of the distinctions between two-dimensional and three-dimensional space. Employing photography and sculpture in equal measure throughout her practice, Hornig supports and expands each of these mediums by cross-referencing one with the other.

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‘Radically Reduce’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 183 cm
2004
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‘No. 9’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 189 cm
2007
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‘No. 10’
C-print on Perspex
130 x 177 cm
2007
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‘Kleines Fenster’
C-print on Glass
80 x 116 cm
2009
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‘No. 12’
C-print on Glass
115 x 142 cm
2009
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‘No. 11’
C-print on Perspex
150 x 200 cm
2007
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‘Window with No Floor’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 195 cm
2006
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For Sabine Hornig, the window represents a basic, transparent, grid-like system that incorporates her ideas on the gaze, view and perspective, which oscillate between image and sculpture. Hornig finds the windows she uses in her photographs incidentally in modern cities, mostly in Berlin. Intentionally made visible or invisible, the window functions as a prevalent frame that contains certain flows, a certain motility between interior and exterior, public and private, transparency and distortion, open and closed space, and associated with this last pairing of terms, flight and confinement.

Through her activity of foregrounding the transparency (rather than the transparentness) of the palimpsestual threshold of the glass/window in her photographs, Hornig obliges us to become aware of glass (by means of Plexiglas) as a complex structure, a responsive surface and the window as a doubling boundary. In her recent suite of photographs of vacant shop windows, the artist not only expands on our awareness of the optics of the window as a sill, but raises these abandoned commercial spaces from their state of quiescent limbo to places where, in their emptiness, we are given reign to imagine past identity and future existence, where our emotions swing between melancholy and hope in the face of our ever-changing, mutant cities. – [Press Release: ‘Landscape Negative’ 2007]

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Sabine Hornig : Website

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04
Apr
11

Zander Blom : “The Black Hole Universe” (Photography)

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Chapter 1. Scene 002
C-print (metallic)
60 x 87cm
2009

Chapter 1. Scene 012
C-print (metallic)
60 x 87cm
2009

Chapter 2. Scene 027
C-print (metallic)
60 x 87cm
2010

Chapter 2. Scene 029
C-print (metallic)
60 x 87cm
2010

Chapter 2. Scene 041
C-print (metallic)
60 x 87cm
2010

Chapter 2. Scene 001
C-print (metallic)
60 x 87cm
2010

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‘The Black Hole Universe’ is a long-term photographic book and exhibition project. It involves building makeshift installations in different gallery and studio spaces in cities around the world, and employing them to generate photographic still images for an imaginary futuristic sci-fi noir space film. Each installation functions as a set from a film, and each photographic image functions as a still from a specific scene within a particular chapter of the film. Although the project has many qualities of a film it lacks the main component, that is: a film. The intended final outcome for the project is a publication that contains a series of still images and texts, together with an exhibition of photographic prints and props from the installations. In addition the individual chapters will be shown in the cities in which they are produced, including Sao Paulo, Berlin, Antwerp, Brussels and Miami. [Extract : Galerie van der Mieden]

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Zander Blom : Michael Stevenson Gallery

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05
Feb
11

Sonja Braas : “Forces” Series (Photography)

Forces #1
C Print, Diasec
170 x 150 cm
2002

Forces #17
C Print, Diasec
170 x 150 cm
2003

Forces #3
C Print, Diasec
170 x 150 cm
2002

Forces #31
C Print, Diasec
170 x 150 cm
2003

Forces #24
C Print, Diasec
170 x 150 cm
2003

Forces #23
C Print, Diasec
170 x 150 cm
2003

Sonja Braas photography is a culmination of a world spanning project which has been in the making for several years. Braas makes photographs in museums of natural history or zoology in which one passes through different environment zones. These are constructed of three-dimensional materials with painted backdrops receding into a mysterious distance. These “sets” can feature stuffed birds with real feathers, plastic or real branches and rocks and artificially simulated daylight, all to instantly convey an atmospheric exotic vision of a far away place. These generalized representations of distant “real” places are in themselves “non” places; though pass on an experience of progressing through rainforest, mountainscape, savannah, desert, wetland etc. Braas frames out the museum surroundings and information plaques of these displays so they appear as nameless natural wilderness. The reputation of photography as truth-teller, “the camera never lies” seals the believability of Braas’ work.

Braas then approaches different environments around the world in the same way. She places her camera in real environments, which the museum displays, represent. When photographing landscapes, she mimics the composition style of the displays, which are constructed by humans to ensure that the given spot where the viewer stands reveals every feature of what is before him/her. The display is made to cater to a human viewpoint, and maybe also to our expectations and anticipation of what nature is like. In turn, when real landscapes when photographed like this they seem held in a suspension of reality where the leaves will never fall and the snow will never melt. When exhibited side by side, one may not know for a while that some are from displays and others not. This is because in interpreting the work, the artist stresses the importance of a lack of clear indicators (as to which is which and where they are located), wishing for them to exist equally and eternally in our imaginations.

[Extract : Galerie Akinci]

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Sonja Braas : Website

Sonja Braas : Fabian & Claude Walter

08
Dec
10

Mark Bentley : ‘0fps – background’ (Photography)

Untitled
C-print
various sizes
2006

Untitled
C-print
various sizes
2006

Untitled
C-print
various sizes
2006

Untitled
C-print
various sizes
2006

Untitled
C-print
various sizes
2006

Untitled
C-print
various sizes
2006

The title of this series is derived from the 24 frames per second typically employed in filmmaking, and implies action in time. Despite the linking of frames, as still images the number per second in this case is frozen to zero. The notion of landscape as background or setting for events is suggested by traces of man’s intervention, whether intentional or accidental. Any possible narrative is confined to the slippage of frames as space between or behind what is revealed: action results instead from what is concealed. The sense of unease this may cause is furthered by the camera adopting the position of Ozu’s: here our view is reduced in height or restricted in order to awaken the senses, as if sitting in a dark room.

Mark Bentley : Website

Mark Bentley : Architectural Photography

02
Nov
10

Roland Fischer : Facades (Photography)

N-2, Brasilia
C-print face-mounted to plexiglass
71 x 49 inches
2006

Metropolitan Plaza, Chongqing
C-print face-mounted to plexiglass
71 x 49 inches
2006

Berrini, Sao Paulo
C-print face-mounted to plexiglass
71 x 49 inches
2006

Roland Fischer focuses our attention directly on a specific entity. In the case of buildings, he fills the frame of his viewfinder with their facades, stripping them of the distracting visual cacophony that normally surrounds them. Isolated so, their vivid colors and dramatic geometries demonstrate a striking formalism and visual punch that call to mind a photographic version of modernist abstract painting.

Roland Fischer : Von Lintel Gallery

Roland Fischer : Durham Press




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By Azurebumble

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