Posts Tagged ‘boundaries

03
Apr
12

Cecil Touchon : ‘Nostalgic Regress’ – Fusion Series (Collage)

::

I’m exploring the boundaries between art and poetry in these intimate papiers colles composed of bits of lettering and the empty spaces between. Stripped of literary meaning, they rely on composition, rhythm and visual movement to convey their meaning which is ambiguous and intuitive. These works are constructed from distressed street posters and billboards that have been edited into inlayed bits of printed matter creating passages that move from figure to ground and then reverse back to figure through gentle curves, irregular grids and subtle shading. Snippets of lettering almost become recognizable letters or perhaps proposals for a new poetic alphabet but always slip back into forms and spaces to create possibilities of enigmatic and open, simultaneously plausible interpretations. [CT]

::

::
Fusion Series #2669
Collage on Paper
8 x 6 in
2009
::

::
Fusion Series #2695
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
::

::
Fusion Series #2696
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
::

::
Fusion Series #2694
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
::

::
Fusion Series #2693
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
::

::
Fusion Series #2692
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
::

::
Fusion Series #2691
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
::

::
Fusion Series #2690
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
::

Touchon’s work is a selection of collaged, acrylic paintings on either canvas or paper. There are several works from his Fusion Series, which present simple geometric shapes simply arranged, within illusionistic frames [framing devices]. There are overlapping rectangles, with rounded wedges that resemble irregularly cut pie sections. Occasionally he inserts bits of paper, spattered with Hebrew script or musical notations. Sometimes he paints paper then cuts out shapes. Other times, collage is in the form of paper applied to the surface, then painted over with solid color, so there is a ghost of a collage.

Most of these works contrast small areas of bright hue with overall neutrally colored surroundings. What is clear is the extent to which Cecil Touchon is in love with a formalism that, way back when, was loaded with revolutionary significance. That he does not think that those early experiments in pure shape and color have been improved upon at all is evident in the way he uses the motifs, and in the way he has antiqued them artificially with pencil shading and other means to make individual elements and the overall compositions into found artifacts…” ~ [Extract : Janet Tyson – Fort Worth Star-Telegram]

::

Cecil Touchon : Website

Cecil Touchon : Photography

::

24
Dec
10

Chris Engman : Photography

‘Equipoise’
archival inkjet print
36″ x 48″
2005

‘Transplant’
archival inkjet print
27″ x 36″
2005

‘The Playground’
archival inkjet print
30″ x 36″
2006

‘The Consummation’
archival inkjet print
28″ x 38″
2005

‘The Library’
archival inkjet print
38″ x 27″
2005

‘The Audience’
archival inkjet print
36″ x 30″
2004

“We often say, photographs “capture” time. But to capture something is not to understand it, because in the act of capture the thing is changed. Family albums, travel photographs- what they do with time is give it boundaries. They make memory possible by giving it shape. They describe an event or a place as if in the absence of time, as if time does not exist.” Chris Engman

Much of my recent work takes place in the desert at a site in eastern Washington that I found two years ago and has by its gravity kept me going back. The place, for me, has a psychologically charged but neutral energy, like an unformed dream or empty canvas waiting to be acted upon.

For inspiration, in addition to the desert, I turn to books: epic novels, epic histories, and fiction rich in visual imagery. I especially appreciate thinkers who address the grandest of human themes, which are also my themes: grandeur and the ordinary, struggle and futility, illusion and disillusionment, meaningfulness, age, and death.

Working in the desert has come to be a form of meditation. Days are spent, sometimes with a crew but more often in solitude, wordlessly driving, carrying supplies, erecting structures and sets, and studying the slow progress of the sun overhead and its all-powerful, shape-changing, comfort giving and taking effects. My state of mind while I work can range from joy and contentedness to emptiness and doubt, and I believe these shifting emotions, intensified by an intense place, carry through into the best of my eventual photographs. (artist statement)

Chris Engman : Website

02
Jul
10

Danwen Xing : Urban Fiction

Urban Fiction, image 26, 2006 [with detail]

Urban Fiction, image 3, 2005 [with detail]

Urban Fiction, image 15, 2005 [with detail]

Urban Fiction, image 12, 2008 [with detail]

Urban Fiction, image 24, 2006 [with detail]

Urban Fiction, image 18, 2004 [with detail]

Urban Fiction : 2004 – present : photography with digital manipulation

My interest for urban subject has been complated in my mind for years but the particular idea of this work was forged some time in 2004 while I traveled extensively in Europe. After being in so many cities in the world, I realized that globalization has made urban landscapes everywhere similar and blurred the boundaries between them. So often, “here” can be anywhere. With this work, I have brought my vision and perspective to these urban spaces.

The architectural structures that I photographed are all maquettes made to promote real-estate developments that are being planned in China today. Some of the buildings already exist, and others will soon begin construction. When you face these models showing such a variety of different spaces and think about the life-styles associated with them, you start to wonder: is this the picture of life today? Do we really live in this kind of space and environment?

Globalization is reshaping our urban environment and our vision of contemporary life – which celebrates the “new” constantly replacing the “old.” As personal living spaces expand with the growth of income, the cityscape becomes more dense, filled up with modern buildings and high-rise towers. People live in cubes that are squeezed next to one another, separated only by thin walls. This physical proximity, instead of leading to greater closeness and intimacy between people, can often create psychological distance and loneliness.

The sculptural form of these new residential buildings, the floor plan of the apartments, and the various interior designs are all related to the inhabitants and their “individual” taste and needs. The models of these new living spaces are perfect, clean and beautiful but they are also so empty and detached of human drama. When you take these models and begin to add real life – even a single drop of it – so much changes.

This entire body of work of “Urban Fiction” is playful and fictitious – wandering between reality and fantasy. All the figures in this series are acts of me, playing different characters. This creates another paradox: “I” am real but at the same time “I” am unreal. The figures act out totally imaginative roles and fanciful stories, staged within the maquettes, their plots invented by me and visualized for these spaces. For example, “I” am a white-collar office worker brought to despair by job pressures and spiritual emptiness. Sometimes “I” am a materialistic woman enjoying a life of pleasure and dissipation. Or “I” am a young girl who, in a moment of unrestrained rage, accidentally killed her lover. Together, the resulting pictures compose an episodes, serialized narrative structure for “Urban Fiction”. As a whole, these images represent the state of urban life today.

In the period of my childhood in China, skyscrapers were unattainable concepts connected to the West, viewable only in films or magazines. Today I live in the pictures I make and I, along with my compatriots, can imagine our future by bending down to examine tiny models of buildings. This, perhaps, is another reality of the “fantasies” which govern our contemporary life. [extract from Artists Statement}

Urban Fiction Series

Danwen Xing’s Website




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

email address

Join 501 other followers

%d bloggers like this: