Posts Tagged ‘blurred

10
Jul
12

Reiko Imoto : ‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series (Photography)

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Reiko has a unique eye and her works look mysterious and surreal, yet the subject matter that she captures are from her everyday life. Inspired by her own inner reality, subconscious world, dreams, childhood memories, psychology, Surrealist paintings and films, fairytales, music, poetry, and every single ordinary thing she sees that give her many perspectives. She is mostly interested in things which we only can see when our eyes are closed, such as dreams, memories, imagination, and so on. [Profile]

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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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This body of work is about my feeling of forgetting. Sometimes I cannot remember my dream after waking up, even though I know I had a dream and I try to recall it very much. What I remember is only a feeling or mood from the dream without visual evidence. I try to imagine things, or people’s faces as the keywords that might have been in the dream. However, there is only a mood of mystery, melancholia, nostalgia, or happiness remaining in my mind; as if I remember the smell of a particular food, but I do not remember what the food could be at all. In such occasions, I feel as if my memories and dreams are trapped in a “drawer” of my subconscious mind and I cannot find a “key” to open it and to see inside, where there would be something important for myself. I imagine that people who have amnesia must feel something like that all the time. I once had a chance to ask a question to a psychologist who studies dreams, “Do amnesiacs have dreams of their old memories?” The psychologist answered me, “Yes. They have such dreams, but they never remember what they dreamt about.” Throughout this project, I have tried to express my own feelings of a forgotten, unknown memory, imagining an atmosphere of dream visions that would never have remained in an amnesiac’s memory. Exploring the feeling of forgetting might not be as valuable as focusing on exploring the feeling of remembering in our lives. However, recognizing the existence of forgetting, as a part of the workings of the mind, might set us free from our own “mind drawers”. – Reiko Imoto : Artists Statement

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Reiko Imoto : Website

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06
Jul
12

Masako Miyazaki : ‘The Other Side’ Series (Photography)

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“What is
On the other side
In the forest
draped in uncertainty
I am alone,
gazing in admiration”

Masako Miyazaki

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‘The Other Side’ Series
Masako Miyazaki
Photograph
2011
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‘The Other Side’ Series
Masako Miyazaki
Photograph
2011
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‘The Other Side’ Series
Masako Miyazaki
Photograph
2011
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‘The Other Side’ Series
Masako Miyazaki
Photograph
2011
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‘The Other Side’ Series
Masako Miyazaki
Photograph
2011
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‘The Other Side’ Series
Masako Miyazaki
Photograph
2011
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‘The Other Side’ Series
Masako Miyazaki
Photograph
2011
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Masako Miyazaki’s book The Other Side, was published in late 2011 by Tosei-sha. On viewing it feels like you’re being taken by the hand on a journey into different places. That is not just physical locations, but places in the mind. On studying the images closely, they were taken in a variety of locations, there are images of Japan and elsewhere, yet despite the variety, the image content, texture and style allows them to be presented together whilst maintaining a common theme between them. Location or subject is not what strings them together. On a depictive level, a commonality between the images soon becomes apparent: as the square black and white images almost all seem to be focused on the very remote distance, irrespective of whether the near distance contains any subject of interest.

Additionally, a very close distance object is often obscuring our view slightly – a wall, high-grown grass, a tree, bushy vegetation or similar. We’re often peering over or around those obstructions with a sense of safety as if guarding us from the scene from waist level (possibly due to the use of a medium format camera with waist level finder), like a child who stumbled upon a scene accidentally while running after a ball or a butterfly. Now we find ourselves slightly outside our comfort zone, exactly on the thin line of being equally thrilled and curious to move further while at the same time frightened and wanting to go back to familiar grounds. Here we stand still now, hearing only our own breath and the sounds of nature, frozen in time by our minds and in turn by the capture of the photograph. We’ve become one with the scene, with the environment, except that unlike the trees or bushes around us we have a gaze into the scene and our view is set on the horizon, the infinite distance. – [Extract : J.E.]

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Masako Miyazaki : Website

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03
Jul
12

Takuma Nakahira : “For a Language to Come” (Photography 2)

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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photograph
1970
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Published in 1970, “For a Language to Come” is recorded in the history of photography as the first photobook by Takuma Nakahira, the photographer who brought about a turning point in contemporary Japanese photography from the late 1960s to the early 1970s by radically breaking away from the existing image aesthetics at that time. This book consists of one hundred black and white photographs including his work from the legendary photography magazine “Provoke.” However, forty years after the publication of the original book, we have not as yet had the opportunity to examine (and enjoy) his works enough with the exception of a few photographs that has been repeatedly introduced on various occasions (this is particularly true in Europe and the U.S. where the history of contemporary Japanese photography remains less appreciated). Through radical self-critique, Nakahira would repudiate much of this early body of work in his 1973 essay, “Why an Illustrated Botanical Dictionary?” and considered it as something that must be overcome. Yet, for us to reconsider the meaning of the author’s rejection of his inaugural work, it is extremely valuable to know what the works themselves show. Has our history of photography finally caught up with Nakahira? The 2010 republication of “For a Language to Come,” is an attempt to engage Nakahira’s photographic point of departure again in the present, to discover this work as one that is more vibrantly resonant today. [Extract : Osiris Publishing]

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Takuma Nakahira : Shugo Arts

Takuma Nakahira : American Suburb X

Takuma Nakahira : “For a Language to Come” part 1

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02
Jul
12

Takuma Nakahira : ‘For a Language to Come’ (Photography)

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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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‘For a Language to Come’
Takuma Nakahira
Photographs
1970
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Blurred, grainy and out-of-focus was the modus operandi of the Japanese Provoke photographers of the early 1970s, and Takuma Nakahira was the intellectual granddaddy of them all. This reprint of his classic ‘For a Language to Come’ is shot with harsh black and white images printed full bleed across every page and is essential viewing for anybody with an interest in the history of photography. It’s a book of landscapes, urban landscapes where life clings to the shadows and corners of the pictures, where light burns like fire and the only solace is to be found in the underpasses and tunnels of the city that Nakahira portrays. And what a city! It’s an unwelcoming place, a Tokyo where post-war modernisation and political protest have combined to create a world lacking in any warmth or humanity.

Nakahira’s Tokyo is a pre-apocalyptic dead zone. Or perhaps it’s a post-apocalyptic deadzone. It doesn’t really matter because the effect is the same; a place where people lie injured in waiting rooms, where phone lines and power cables suggest an entity that has taken on its own hostile life, where the only means of escape are suggested by the trackways in the road and in the repeated pictures of a cold and turbulent ocean. And that’s the fun part. For a Language to Come also serves as a thesis for Nakahira’s complex forays in the semiotics of visual language and his existentialist idea that photography “consists only in clarifying the fact that material things are things.” A few years after For a Language to Come was published, Takahira wrote that “Extremely grainy images and intentionally unfocussed photographs in particular, have already become mere decoration.” I can think of many examples where that might be true, but Nakahira’s case, it most definitely is not. — Text : Colin Pantall

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Takuma Nakahira : Shugo Arts

Takuma Nakahira : American Suburb X

‘For a Language to Come’ – View Book : Vimeo

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09
Apr
12

Chris Fraser : ‘Drawl’ Series (Photography)

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‘Neighborhood 334’
‘Drawl’ Series
Photograph
2009
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‘Neighborhood 238’
‘Drawl’ Series
Photograph
2009
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‘Neighborhood 202’
‘Drawl’ Series
Photograph
2009
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‘Neighborhood 171’
‘Drawl’ Series
Photograph
2009
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‘Neighborhood 169’
‘Drawl’ Series
Photograph
2009
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‘Neighborhood 142’
‘Drawl’ Series
Photograph
2009
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‘Neighborhood 27’
‘Drawl’ Series
Photograph
2008
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Chris Fraser : Website

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15
Dec
11

Ali Chraibi : ‘Downtown Memories’ (Photography)

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‘Downtown Memories’
Photography
Ali Chraibi
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‘Downtown Memories’
Photography
Ali Chraibi
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‘Downtown Memories’
Photography
Ali Chraibi
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‘Downtown Memories’
Photography
Ali Chraibi
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‘Downtown Memories’
Photography
Ali Chraibi
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‘Downtown Memories’
Photography
Ali Chraibi
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‘Downtown Memories’
Photography
Ali Chraibi
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‘Downtown Memories’ series captures classically un-photogenic neighborhoods of Marrakesh through nicked and dirty car windows panes. Shooting encased in a moving vehicle, Chraibi managed to achieve well-composed, satisfyingly grainy images specked with points of light. He shows the true nature of the constructions of a city by taking us on a journey into a universal city. The shapes and shades of black & white structures seem familiar, but the vision is blurred and distant, through rain and fragmented light.

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Ali Chraibi : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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