Posts Tagged ‘birds

12
Jul
12

Masahisa Fukase : “The Solitude of Ravens” (Photography)

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Masahisa Fukase is considered to be both a legend and an enigma in his native Japan. For a culture that is traditionally reluctant to expose emotion in public, the expressionistic character of his work was, in part, the result of the development of the generation that evolved after WWII. Fukase growing up in a decade in which mannered self-control was not the ideal civic behavior. This new perspective, coupled with the effects of war, exploded into the avant-garde scene in Tokyo. Inelegant printing techniques emerged and the manic style of photography that he shared with his contemporaries, such as Eikoh Hosoe, Daidoh Moriyama, and Shomei Tomatsu, reflected the “reaction to a world turned upside down.”

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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase’s expressionist photo series on the species of ravens represents a ten-year-obsession with the dark-edged worlds of ravens, shot on annual trips from Tokyo to Hokkaido, Fukase’s birthplace. Clearly the omen of misfortune, that has been traditionally assigned to ravens in almost all cultures, reigns over the sombre photographs taken. These display isolated or massive groupings of ravens, variously appearing at night or by day throughout a diverse Japanese landscape. Sitting on telephone poles, at the beach or on the edges of villages, the ravens’ immutable and terrifying presence permeates these photographs with signs of potential, impending or sure loss. The darkened nature of the pictures might not be coincidental regarding that they were taken in a period of personal pain and suffering after the photographer’s divorce in 1976. Fukase’s works are part of the Japanese new photography that is wrenched into different forms based on the spirit of personal experience and contrasting the earlier ideal of mannered self-control [Extract : Artnet]

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Masahisa Fukase : Wirtz Gallery

Masahisa Fukase : Robert Mann Gallery

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02
May
12

Ben Ali Ong : Photography Series

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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Ballads of the Dead and Dreaming’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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Throughout my work I have been primarily interested in the suggestive possibilities between the images, and the open narrative I can create by juxtaposing the interior and exterior world beside each other. Portraits next to landscape, for example, and the tension between these two environments. Whilst there are reoccurring motifs and symbols that appear throughout, the importance is on mood, metaphor and emotion, and how different subjects can both carry these feelings and somehow come together, creating my own ambiguous black and white world – similar in a way to the surrealist 1920’s film noir. Birds are frequent symbols that appear throughout the work. Inspired by mythology, they assume a variety of roles. They have been symbols of power and freedom throughout the ages, and are seen to link the human world to the divine. Silhouetted birds in the cloud scape, brooding vistas, faces emerging from darkness, all come together in an attempt to produce an imaginative and mysterious landscape. Early visual influences for me have been Caravaggio and Francis Bacon, beginning with a general attraction to the darker sensibilities of each artists work and it’s sometimes macabre nature. The use of stark, direct lighting and heavy shadows in Caravaggio’s paieces, as well Bacon’s apparent painted ‘blur’ have both made their technical influences. By shooting 35mm black and white film and layering negatives together during the scanning stage, as well as the use of surface scratching and inscriptions to the negative, I try evoke a dream like detachment of an earlier age. BAO

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Ben Ali Ong : Website

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14
Jul
10

Georges Braque : Birds

“Reality only reveals itself when it is illuminated by a ray of poetry” Georges Braque

Georges Braque
October bird
1962
Lithograph

Georges Braque
If I died over there
Wood Engraving
1962

Georges Braque
Birds
Lithograph
1955

Georges Braque
Birds on Blue
Lithograph
1955

Georges Braque
The white bird
1961
Lithograph

Georges Braque
The Library is on fire
1956
Etching

Georges Braque
Night Flight
1957
Lithograph

Georges Braque
Two birds on blue background
1960
Lithograph

Georges Braque
Two Birds
1958
Serigraph

Georges Braque
The Duck
1956
Oil and gouache on panel

Throughout his life, Braque produced numerous prints, mastering the techniques of etching, lithography, aqua-tint and woodcut. Unlike etching however, which relies more on the technique of drawing, lithography leans more toward painting allowing the artist to use color in his compositions. Braque’s lithographs however are not merely imitations of his paintings. In his early lithographs he reacted to the possibilities offered by the medium and achieved a texture that was foreign to his etchings and a transparency quite different from the density of his oil paintings.

In 1945, after a short hiatus, Braque returned to lithography and he continued to pursue this until the end of his life. This time his approach to the medium is different in that he no longer allows the grain but only the color to speak. He rejects the accurate capabilities of the line and instead deliberately thickens his strokes to give them a more painterly feel. The stroke is sufficiently thick so that even when black is used, it will have the impact of a color. This unusual quality of line should not be mistaken for mishandling or inexperience but rather a shift to a more painterly style and point of view.

Georges Braque Prints

Georges Braque Lithographs




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