Posts Tagged ‘beauty

14
Jul
13

Robert Adams :: Photography

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Are there affirmable days or places in our deteriorating world? Are there scenes in life, right now, for which we might conceivably be thankful? Is there a basis for joy or serenity, even if felt only occasionally? Are there grounds now and then for an unironic smile?” ~ Robert Adams

For four decades Adams has photographed the changing landscape of the American West, finding there a fragile beauty that endures despite our troubled relationship with nature, and with ourselves. His photos are distinguished not only by their economy and lucidity, but also by their mixture of grief and hope. [Ext]

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‘Colorado Springs, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘A backyard, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘The New West series’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Pikes Peak, Colorado Springs’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1979
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‘Eden, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1976-1982
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‘Untitled’
Robert Adams
photograph
1978
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Robert Adams was born in New Jersey in 1937. He was a professor of English literature for several years before turning his full attention to photography in the mid 1970s. His work is largely concerned with moments of regional transition: the suburbanization of Denver, a changing Los Angeles of the 1970s and 1980s, and the clear-cutting in Oregon in the 1990s. His many books, well-known to those concerned with the American Landscape, include The New West, From the Missouri West, Summer Nights, Los Angeles Spring, To Make It Home, Listening to the River, West From the Columbia, What We Bought, Notes for Friends, California, Summer Nights, Walking, What Can We Believe Where? and The Place We Live. [Ext]

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Robert Adams :: The Place We Live

Robert Adams :: Fraenkel Gallery

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05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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04
Jul
12

Issei Suda : Photography

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‘Untitled (Sunflower)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Girl on swing)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Clouds)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kuroishi, Aomori, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Eyes and bicycles)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kanda, Tokyo, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Woman behind flowers)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Skirt)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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Issei Suda’s complex portraits and street scenes reveal his intense interest in the mysterious side of everyday life and otherworldliness. His first notable book and exhibition ‘Fushi Kaden’ (transmission of the flower of acting style} was a series based on the fifteenth-century treatise by ‘Zeami’ on the principles of ‘No theatre.’ Suda, a devout student of Zeami, translates the treatise in photographs that return to an emotional landscape that predates the rise of cities produced on his trips to remote locations in Japan from 1971 – 1978. Often his photographs are suspended in time, either one moment too soon or too late, allowing for an unsettling effect on the viewer. His fascination continues in photographic scenes remembered from days past and preserved regardless of time. His series include people who dress up for festivals, dreamlike landscapes and studies of pattern, texture and beauty. [X]

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Issei Suda : Higher Pictures

Issei Suda : Charles A Hartman

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10
Mar
12

Annie Woodford : Ceramics

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‘Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere’

Blaise Pascal, mathematician, poet and philosopher.

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‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
46 x 12 x 12 cm
2009
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‘Silent Constrainer’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
38 x 24 x 18 cm
2008
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‘Slice’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
16 x 12 x 20 cm
2010
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‘Veiled Core’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
30 x 30 x 25 cm
2010
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‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
alternative view
2009
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‘Splinter 1’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
2009
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‘Splinter 1’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
Detail, 2009
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Artist Statement

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Intrigued by the tenuous connection between past, present and future and the shadowy, illusive meaning of time, Annie Woodford makes work that is both haunting and enigmatic. Shifting boundaries between science and metaphysics and an enduring interest in parallel universe theory instill the pieces with a heightened intensity, whilst an obsession with hidden worlds has prompted her investigations into microscopy and the nano universe – making the unseen seen. Captivated by the natural world and our mysterious, infinite universe – whether seen at macroscopic or microscopic levels – she finds them the source of endless fascination and wonder.

Mankind’s place within that universe and the dichotomy between our wish for progress and our proclivity for self-destruction, has become a central theme. A passion for frozen environments and the message they embrace, not only from the past but also for the future of our planet has resulted in research trips to the Arctic and Iceland and a detailed study of the coldest place on Earth – Antarctica. The work has qualities that reflect the intricacies of the natural world, elements that highlight its beauty and transience. Fragile, complex and esoteric, delicately balanced between risk and control, Annie’s pieces float and oscillate between absence and presence, hovering silently in a place between.

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Annie Woodford : Website

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30
Jan
12

Linus Lohoff : ‘Subjects’ (Photography)

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‘Subjects Series’
Linus Lohoff
Photograph
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‘Subjects Series’
Linus Lohoff
Photograph
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‘Subjects Series’
Linus Lohoff
Photograph
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‘Subjects Series’
Linus Lohoff
Photograph
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‘Subjects Series’
Linus Lohoff
Photograph
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‘Subjects Series’
Linus Lohoff
Photograph
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“Things from the beach at the beach, where the light makes them look like sculptures or installations. This light gives them importance and beauty even if they’re just small buildings of human creation.”

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Linus Lohoff : CargoCollective

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03
Dec
11

Bohnchang Koo : ‘White’ Series (Photography)

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Bohnchang’s work has always dealt with impermanence, with the decay and disappearance of living things. In his recent work, Koo continues this long journey to capture the fleeting and the mortal. In these spare natural landscapes—the sea, pine needles on snow, dust on a wall, withered vines —the artist renders scenes of exquisite beauty while evoking the inexorable passage of time. [Luminous Lint]

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‘White 11’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 10’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 13’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 12’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 5’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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‘White 7’
Photograph
Bohnchang Koo
2000
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“Koo photographs images of the fragile and the fleeting, never the immortal, of distance and solitude, never attachment or survival. An object gets old from use, remaining indifferent to artistic intention and control, attentive only to its own unerring interior progression, which leaves its disappearing traces long after the photo has been taken, thus moving its past into the future. And thus artist and spectator, who exist outside the photo and cannot enter it, must wander as strangers. From the initial choice of subject, loss is inevitable… Destiny‘s fleeting object, disappearance and sadness of life even before life ever was, returns to silence. In this fleeting is splendor, refinement and beauty.” H Kim

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Bohnchang Koo : Website

Bohnchang Koo : Lens Culture

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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