Posts Tagged ‘American

08
Dec
10

Louis Stettner : ‘Penn Station’ (Photography)

‘Six Windows’
Penn Station
gelatin silver print
1958

‘A Game of Cards’
Penn Station
gelatin silver print
1958

‘Empty Train’
Penn Station
gelatin silver print
1958

‘Commuters, Evening Train’
Penn Station
gelatin silver print
1958

‘Odd Man in’
Penn Station
gelatin silver print
1958

‘Woman on a Train’ (Six Lights)
Penn Station
gelatin silver print
1958

Louis Stettner is a celebrated American photographer whose work includes iconic images of Paris and New York. He was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York but moved to Paris in the 1950s, where he now lives permanently with his family. Louis has photographed Paris and New York for over 60 years, capturing the changes in the people, culture, and architecture of both cities.

Using both black and white and color images, his work documents fleeting moments in the life of the cities, moments that often cannot be recaptured. Stettner has documented the architectural and cultural evolution of Paris and New York, making his archive of thousands of images an important resource. Few photographers have such an extensive archive of both cities, one that includes historic images of each city’s most celebrated landmarks and the daily lives of its citizens.

His work has an unforced naturalistic quality to it, as he sought to capture the ordinary, every day lives of his subjects. He was particularly interested in documenting the lives of the working class in each city and he demonstrates much sensitivity in this endeavor, photographing them with great dignity. A limited amount of his work is devoted to still life and landscape images. Additionally, his paintings and sculptures tend to be abstract and in sharp contrast to his clear, vivid photographic images.

Louis Stettner : Website

Louis Stettner : Bonni Benrubi Gallery

02
Nov
10

John Baldessari : The Giacometti Variations

John Baldessari : The Giacometti Variations
Fondazione Prada, Milan, Italy
October 29 – December 26, 2010

‘the giacometti variations’ by american conceptual artist john baldessari is an original installation made to be featured at the prada foundation in milan, italy. as the name of the project states, baldessari took influence from the imagery projected by the swiss sculptor, alberto giacometti, and has created nine, oversized female figures stretched to an extremely slender form. The 4.5 meter tall sculptures, made out of resin and steel then sprayed with bronze, were clothed in garments and objects also designed by baldessari. the result is an immobile, snapshot of a fashion show, integrating the ideas of art and fashion on a dramatic, larger-than-life scale.

Between the columns and under the exposed arches of the space at the prada foundation, the figures are dressed in looks are grounded in archetypes found in the interrelationship between film and fashion, such as the hot-pink bow in duchess satin (an ironic revisiting of the 1950s hollywood glamour of marilyn monroe), dorothy’s ruby slippers in ‘the wizard of oz’, and humphrey bogart’s trench coat in ‘casablanca’. the installation will unfold in segments throughout the months, showing a total of eighteen different loos in rotation. through this process of transformation, baldessari aims to underscore our society’s current trend of consumption and the rate at which fashion is consumed.

“I’ve always wanted to do tall paintings and sculptures. I suspect it’s because I am quite tall. I’ve had little opportunity since most galleries have wall heights that mirror the wall heights of collector’s homes. A few years ago, I was invited to show in Haus Der Kunst, Munich. Since the entrance hall is extremely tall, I began thinking about tall work I could do there to capture the space. One of my ideas was the idea that I have proposed to the Prada Foundation. My plan is to elongate standing Giacometti sculptures and clothe them with garments.” [Extract : John Baldessari – ‘The Giacometti Variations’ : Designboom]

John Baldessari : The Independent

13
Jul
10

Stuart Davis : Painter

“I can work from Nature, from old sketches and paintings of my own, from photographs, and from other works of art. In each case the process consists of transposition of the forms of the subject into a coherent, objective color-space continuum, which evokes a direct sensate response to structure.”

Stuart Davis
Egg Beater No. 3
1928

Stuart Davis
Egg Beater No. 4
1928

Stuart Davis
Impression of the New York World’s Fair
1938

Stuart Davis
The Mellow Pad
1945-1951

Stuart Davis
New York Waterfront
1938

Stuart Davis
Gloucester Harbor
1938

Stuart Davis
Swing Landscape
1938

Stuart Davis
Colonial Cubism
1954

“A Drawing is the correct title for my work,” the artist Stuart Davis wrote in a 1954 notebook. He meant the correct title for all his work, including the high-color, post-Cubist, proto-Pop paintings that have made him a revered presence in the American modernist pantheon. Davis’s devotion to drawing, to the act of laying down lines on a surface, had nothing to do with academic convention, which he scorned. For him drawing seemed to carry existential weight. Without the defining, containing line, all is confusion; chaos prevails; the bottom falls out of life and art.

He was very American in this way. We are a linear-thinking, line-making people, a nation of surveyors, measurers, calculators, plotters, mappers, dividers. To our forebears the fearful wilderness was something to build a straight road through. The horizon wasn’t some romantic Beyond; it was a goal to be reached in x number of days, months, years. Drawing anchors us in space, gives us coordinates and direction. It is the thread in the labyrinth, guiding us through.

[Cotter, Holland. “In Grace Notes, Linear Riffs on Reality,” The New York Times, January 4, 2008.]

Stuart Davis Catalogue

12
Jul
10

Donald Judd : ‘The Simple Expression Of Complex Thought’.

Donald Judd
Cloth in Illustrated Jacket
1993

Donald Judd
Untitled
1987

Donald Judd
Menziken 87-55
1987

Donald Judd
Untitled
1974

Donald Judd
Untitled
1971

Donald Judd
Untitled (Core Piece)
1969

Donald Judd
Untitled
1972

One of the most significant American artists of the post-war period, Donald Judd changed the course of modern sculpture. Working in New York in the 1960s, Judd became known as one of the key exponents of ‘Minimalism’, but it was a label that he strongly rejected. Although he shared many of the principles identified with Minimalist art — the use of industrial materials to create abstract works that emphasise the purity of colour, form, space and materials — he preferred to describe his own work as ‘the simple expression of complex thought’.

In the late 1940s he began to practice as a painter, but by the late 1950s was working to free his painting of traditional ‘European’ preoccupations with composition and illusionism. In the early 1960s, Judd began to introduce three dimensional elements onto the surface of his works, at first creating reliefs, and then moving towards entirely free-standing structures which he called ‘specific objects’. By 1963 he had established an essential vocabulary of forms — ‘stacks’, ‘boxes’ and ‘progressions’ — which preoccupied him for the next thirty years.

Judd broke new ground in his exploration of volume, interval, space and colour . He rejected the tradition of artistic expression and craftsmanship by using industrial materials such as Plexiglas, sheet metal and plywood, and from the mid-1960s his works were fabricated by external manufacturers. By encouraging concentration on the volume and presence of the structure and the space around it, Judd’s work draws particular attention to the relationship between the object, the viewer, and its environment. This relationship became a central focus of Judd’s career, and he devoted much of his later life to the sympathetic installation of his own work.

Judd’s engagement with philosophy, architecture, design and politics informed his own work, and influenced succeeding generations of artists and designers. His pared-down forms and sensuous use of industrial materials remain a feature of much contemporary art, architecture and design. [Extract : Tate Modern]

Donald Judd : Tate Collection

Nick Serota on Donald Judd : Videos

07
Jul
10

Richard Serra : Sculpture : Forty Years

Band, 2006

Sequence, 2006

Sequence, 2006

Band, 2006

Band, 2006

Torqued Torus Inversion, 2006.

Torqued Torus Inversion, 2006.

Torqued Torus Inversion, 2006.

Serra graduated from Yale University’s School of Art and Architecture in 1964, where he was primarily trained as a painter. After two years in Europe he started working as a sculptor; living in New York in 1966 he started to use non-traditional materials and techniques to transform traditional definitions of the genre. From his casts of rubber he moved onto metal, at one point even throwing spoonfuls of molten lead against a wall in a warehouse to not just create an object, but to create it through a very distinct, deliberate kind of action, an idea of process which he continued exploring through his subsequent ‘Verb List’ from 1967-8, playful prop pieces (such as ‘One Ton Prop – house of cards’ from 1969) and eventual larger transformations of existing space with his signature standing steel pieces.

I went straight for one of the most striking three new pieces specially made for the show – ‘Band’ from 2006 – letting my feet take me in and out of curves that always looked familiar yet endlessly new despite having seen the floorplan several times, and suddenly felt dizzy with perspectival vertigo (not just from the chanting), constantly thinking about that oft-quoted bit where Serra talks about a pivotal moment in his life, visiting his father working in a shipyard and seeing the large steel works hanging over his head as if about to fall. There’s a lot of steel hanging over your head at this show, whether it is a teetering curving wall or a slab of it attached to the ceiling (with something stronger than superglue i kept telling myself), and at times it can all feel a little claustrophobic, in contrast with his open-air works, but somehow at some point you forget about any sense of danger and become totally humbled and mesmerised with the beauty of aging texture, the artist’s revolutionary decision to present sculpture directly on walls and the ground bypassing pedestals still aglow with possibility, his ongoing, quest for always different, deeper and more abstract spatial experiences winning more converts by initiation. [extract : Lupe Nunez-Fernandez : Saatchi Gallery]

Richard Serra : Sculpture : Forty Years : MoMa Interactive

Video : A conversation with artist Richard Serra : Part 1

Video : A conversation with artist Richard Serra : Part 2




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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