Posts Tagged ‘America

14
Jul
13

Robert Adams :: Photography

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Are there affirmable days or places in our deteriorating world? Are there scenes in life, right now, for which we might conceivably be thankful? Is there a basis for joy or serenity, even if felt only occasionally? Are there grounds now and then for an unironic smile?” ~ Robert Adams

For four decades Adams has photographed the changing landscape of the American West, finding there a fragile beauty that endures despite our troubled relationship with nature, and with ourselves. His photos are distinguished not only by their economy and lucidity, but also by their mixture of grief and hope. [Ext]

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‘Colorado Springs, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘A backyard, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘The New West series’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Pikes Peak, Colorado Springs’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1979
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‘Eden, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1976-1982
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‘Untitled’
Robert Adams
photograph
1978
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Robert Adams was born in New Jersey in 1937. He was a professor of English literature for several years before turning his full attention to photography in the mid 1970s. His work is largely concerned with moments of regional transition: the suburbanization of Denver, a changing Los Angeles of the 1970s and 1980s, and the clear-cutting in Oregon in the 1990s. His many books, well-known to those concerned with the American Landscape, include The New West, From the Missouri West, Summer Nights, Los Angeles Spring, To Make It Home, Listening to the River, West From the Columbia, What We Bought, Notes for Friends, California, Summer Nights, Walking, What Can We Believe Where? and The Place We Live. [Ext]

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Robert Adams :: The Place We Live

Robert Adams :: Fraenkel Gallery

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21
Mar
12

Kevin J Miyazaki : ‘Fast Food’ Series (Photography)

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‘Out to Lunch’
Highway 94 Location
Photograph
2006
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‘Absence’
S. Broadway Avenue Location
Photograph
2010
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‘Fast and Loose’
Highway 51 Location
Photograph
2009
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‘Empty/Plenty’
Okemos Road Location
Photograph
2008
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‘Success’
Jones Blvd Location
Photograph
2008
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‘Front Row’
Homer Adams Parkway Location
Photograph
2009
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‘Outside in’
I-75 Location
Photograph
2009
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The series ‘Fast Food’ (2004 – Present) tracks the visual imprint made by the American fast food restaurant on our cultural landscape. These are unsentimental spaces created through corporate analysis of demographics, traffic flow and consumer desire. Yet the spaces have become a familiar comfort to us, quasi-public places experienced widely across common divisions of geography, race and class. The act of eating is pleasurable and intimate, even in these created consumer spaces. When they close, their transformation to urban relic is fast and impersonal, without even a semblance of corporate procedure – often, hand written notes are posted, interiors are disheveled, lights are left on.

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Kevin J Miyazaki : Website

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07
Mar
12

Constantine Manos : ‘Times Square at Night’ (Photography)

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“The flow of people in a setting, their changing relationships to each other and their environment, and their ever changing expressions and movements – all combine to create dynamic situations that provide the photographer with limitless choices of when to push the button. By choosing a precise intersection between subject and time, he may transform the ordinary into the extraordinary and the real into the surreal.” – c.m.

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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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Magnum photographer Constantine Manos explores the dynamic intersection between subject and time, the real and the surreal. Manos captures the varied spectrum of contemporary life in all its offbeat and charming strangeness. These moments are elusive and varied, asking questions without giving ready answers. Ordinary people drift between technicolor landscapes and dark shadows, whilst Manos’s lens unleashes a cacophony of brilliant colours so often overlooked in day to day observation…

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Constantine Manos : Website

Constantine Manos : Magnum Photos

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28
Jan
12

Ernst Haas : Colour Photography

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“I never really wanted to be a photographer. It slowly grew out of the compromise of a boy who desired to combine two goals — explorer or painter. I wanted to travel, see and experience. What better profession could there be than the one of a photographer, almost a painter in a hurry, overwhelmed by too many constantly changing impressions? But all my inspirational influences came much more from all the arts than from photo magazines.” – Ernst Haas

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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1981’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1961’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘America, 1962’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1975’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1975’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘America, 1956’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1952’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘Utah, 1969’
Colour Photography
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Haas’s frustration with the limitations of technology pushed him at every turn to be slightly ahead of his time. He was a technological pioneer with the eye of a painter and the soul of a poet. It has been written that before Haas there was no color photography, only colored photographs. Haas’s first color essay was on New York, the city he would ultimately make his home. When the editors of LIFE magazine saw it, they gave it an unheard-of layout of 24 pages and called it “Magic Images of a City”.

Essays on Paris and Venice followed. Ten years later, when the Museum of Modern Art held their first color retrospective, it was the work of Haas they chose to feature. Though a Magnum photographer in the heyday of photojournalism, Haas was not interested in color as reportage. He was interested in the super-reality of dreams. To achieve this he gave commonplace objects and silhouettes new meaning. A reflection brought home the hidden depths underlying a conventional urban storefront; torn posters peeling off buildings shaped themselves into an art gallery. In his quest to produce feelings, he introduced hues and tones never before seen in printed color. And at all times his work was informed and enlightened by a guiding intelligence capable of great and quizzical humor. – [Essay by Inge Bondi]

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Ernst Haas : Website

Ernst Haas : Getty Images

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09
Sep
10

Todd Hido : Photography

#5154
Chromogenic print
h: 96.5 x w: 121.9 cm
2006

#3179
Chromogenic Print
h: 96.5 x w: 121.9 cm
2003

#4078
Chromogenic Print
h: 96.5 x w: 121.9 cm
2005

#7557-b
Chromogenic Print
h: 50.8 x w: 61 cm
2008

#7557
Chromogenic print
h: 96.5 x w: 121.9 cm
2008

#7552
Chromogenic print
h: 96.5 x w: 121.9 cm
2009

Todd Hido’s photographs present anonymous and ordinary landscape charged with a hauntingly atmospheric and menacing intensity. Hido captures a momentary shift in our perception of these isolated and innocuous places resulting from a confluence of variable elements of place, time of day, light and weather. Wandering alone by car in areas on the edge of cities and towns throughout America, Hido seeks to record the transformation of the seemingly uninteresting to the theatrical, while evidencing his presence as witness.

Hido takes continual road trips in places as far removed as Eastern Washington State, the California Central Valley, Indiana, New Jersey, and South Louisiana. He locates unpeopled landscapes occupied by only by a few telephone poles, a single sad tree, or a road leading nowhere that transform and take on an unreal appearance in these works. Hido often photographs from the driver’s seat and through the car windshield, evidenced in some works by the slight distortion from the glass, inviting the viewer to experience the photographer’s perspective of being on the inside looking out.

[Extract : Todd Hido : ‘Roaming’ Exhibition : Stephen Wirtz Gallery]

Todd Hido : Website

‘A Road Divided’ : Stephen Wirtz Gallery




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