Posts Tagged ‘abstractions

27
Jul
12

Jeremy Blake : Artworks

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“silent symmetry”
jeremy blake
2012
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“industrial prose”
jeremy blake
2012
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“industrial prose #3”
jeremy blake
2012
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“rusted reflection”
jeremy blake
2012
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“mare”
jeremy blake
2012
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“lost legend”
jeremy blake
2012
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Rhythm can be experienced both aurally and visually, and I am intrigued by this notion of visual cadence. This body of work represents a personal synthesis of these principles. The forms and tonalities in the final images are my rendering of the effects I undergo when translating these minor and major chords. I equate the emotional attributes of these chords with a subdued yet inflective element of a unified sequence. It is the evasive and ever changing element of rhythm that fascinates me, and the work is my interpretation of this delicate balance between harmony and discord: capturing the moment which causes refrain, the pause of introspection, in which the rhythms are viewed through individual terms. When viewed on a fundamental level, rhythm is innate. Specifically, when one contemplates the function of rhythm in such acts as breathing, the blinking of the eyes and the beating of the heart. In essence, the experience of rhythm is an intrinsic aspect in the experience of life. It is through the questioning and exploration of this concept that I arrived at the notion of visual cadence. This body of work is meant to explore the kaleidoscopic nature of perception where terms such as wrong or right do not apply for perception itself changes as much as the individual. ~ [Artist Statement]

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Jeremy Blake : Website

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11
Apr
12

Ray K. Metzker : ‘AutoMagic’ Series (Photography)

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Philadelphia, (63 BT-40)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1963
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Philadelphia, (63 AX-26)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1963
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Philadelphia, (63 AI-31)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1963
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Philadelphia, (63 KG-44)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1963
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Philadelphia, (63 DO-41)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1963
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Chicago, (58 AX-22)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1958
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Philadelphia, (65 HM-33)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1965
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Philadelphia, (63 EC-37)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1963
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Philadelphia, (64 AU-13)
vintage silver print
8 x 10″
1964
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From his earliest street pictures taken under the El in Chicago’s Loop in the mid-Fifties, to his most recent highly abstract views of reflections on Philadelphia car windows, Ray K. Metzker brings an exuberance of vision rarely found among today’s photographers. In total control of his camera and craft, Metzker transforms the mundane in daily urban life into intense images that sizzle, and delight the eye. In the darkest recesses of a parking garage, we discover a single shimmering tail fin of a late 50’s Cadillac. In a scene more Orson Welles than Woody Allen, we witness a menacing shadow figure approaching a parked car, intent unknown. In a blizzard, we join the photographer and a single figure as they look at one another wondering why each other is standing there in the cascading snow.

The show also reveals a more tender side of Metzker, as we peer into car windows to see folks uninhibited within their mobile shelters, including a sleeping man with a medallion, head resting on the door; a man reading at the wheel of his damaged white coupe; and a man at the end of long day, hand upon his head. Metzker’s work of the last few years, fondly nicknamed Autowackies, are a brilliant extension of his earlier forays into abstraction, and are only made possible by the contours of our newest cars, which warp the architecture and cloud formations reflected on their glossy surfaces. [LMK]

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Ray K. Metzker : Laurence Miller Gallery

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25
Feb
12

Paul Nicholls : ‘The Serpentine Myth’ (Film Project)

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Paul Nicholls (UK) lives and works in London. He trained in architecture at both Oxford Brookes and the Bartlett School of Architecture in London, and animation, He has worked for many of London’s top and emerging architecture studios including Glenn Howells Architects and Allies and Morrison. He has recently founded the creative film / animation and synthetic architecture company called Factory Fifteen.

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ZZ_FILM 01
DRAWING 01 C
PDN Studio
2010
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ZZ_FILM 01
INTERPRESATION 02
PDN Studio
2010
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ZZ_FILM 01
INTERPRESATION 03
PDN Studio
2010
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ZZ_FILM 01
INTERPRESATION 05
PDN Studio
2010
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ZZ_FILM 01
INTERPRESATION 01
PDN Studio
2010
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ZZ_FILM 01
INTERPRESATION 04
PDN Studio
2010
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A short filming project based on the serpentine pavilion 2010 designed by Jean Nouvel. The project seeked to abstract the spaces with the use of close ups, colour and the construction of the edit. The project also looked at representation of spaces. Collage and re-representation in 3d were also used…

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PDN Studio : Website

Paul Nicholls : Vimeo

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04
Feb
12

Boris Savelev : Photography

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“The camera need not be a cold mechanical device. Like the pen, it is as good as
the man who uses it. It can be the extension of mind and heart…” John Steinbeck

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‘Self Portrait, Madrid’
Boris Savelev
Photograph
2007
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‘Trolley Bus, Moscow’
Boris Savelev
Photograph
2002
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‘Untitled’
Boris Savelev
Photograph
2007
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‘Moncloa, Madrid’
Boris Savelev
Photograph
2008
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‘Speaking Lady, Moscow’
Boris Savelev
Photograph
1988
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‘Untitled’
Boris Savelev
Photograph
2007
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‘Untitled’
Boris Savelev
Photograph
2007
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It’s often said that the camera never lies, it does not always tell us the most meaningful of truths and the task of the fine art photographer is to endow the raw image with further layers of meaning. And the degree of success achieved is, in my view, entirely commensurate with the integrity and honesty with which that task is carried out. Savelev’s work amply exudes these admirable qualities. His photographs observe their subjects mutely yet intelligently rather than exposing them to glare or seeming to intrude on them unnecessarily. His photographs are painterly in composition and in effect.

While Savelev’s photographs have a cool and confident feeling about them, they are never brash or strident. The overt subject matter of his work varies greatly but throughout there is a consistent preoccupation with painterly techniques of composition. The use of colour in is reminiscent of colour field paintings and lyrical abstraction.There are also nods to Russia’s constructivist past in much of his work, and even hints of Neo-Plasticism. The many photographs of scenes in Chernowitz, where Savelev was born, and Moscow, where he lives, avoid the overt politics and sentimentality that frequently accompany works which attempt to be documentary in nature. In Savelev’s work, the purity and beauty of the image, the arrangement of colour, form and light are always paramount in a way that often seems alien to fine art photography today. – [Extract : John Kavanagh’s Review – Colour Construction.]

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Boris Savelev : Factum-Arte

Boris Savelev : Betty Guereta Gallery

Boris Savelev : Russia, Spain, Ukraine

Boris Savelev : Michael Hoppen Gallery

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17
Jan
12

Heidi Leverty : ‘Outbox’ Series (Photography)

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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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“This body of work is about recycled and discarded items that no longer perform the functions for which they were intended. What appears to be without value is in fact a source of inspiration, a bounty of objects d’art. Removed from their first use, these materials of paper, metal, plastic and fabric secrete an unexpected visual richness, the product of chance. My art focuses on items that are part of our daily lives, art that is integrated into the culture and community. My intention is to portray the unique and extraordinary in the seemingly ordinary.

Up close, these mundane and discarded objects become poetic abstractions of strength and emotion. As I see these objects condemned to destruction, I experience the conflict between human classification of uselessness, a sense of loss in wasted function and the unexpected attraction of sublime beauty in overlooked places. Bales of shredded paper, cartons, boxes of varied hues and metal sliced like luncheon meat give way to a collage of life in which we all take part.

Unique and ephemeral works, sculptured forms with an intense beauty, all emerge from piles of rusty metal objects and roll of sheet metal. Their colour markings suggesting comparisons with the splashes of Jackson Pollock. Although these images are abstracts in approach, they are documentary in their representation, and powerful enough to create public awareness and make one reflect on the eventual metamorphosis of these used and unwanted products. Simple objects retired from use in passage from refuse to trash to recycled material.” — Heidi Leverty

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Heidi Leverty : Website

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10
Jan
12

Hiro Yamagata : ‘Transient’ Series (Mixed Media)

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This new series, Transient, is a tour de force that celebrates the cosmic dance between tectonic forces and frail temporal overlays in a dizzying and cinematic symphony of monotones. This series ensures this kaleidoscopic artist will maintain his place at the forefront of the visual avant garde. [Ex – Bill Lowe]

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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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Japanese-American artist Hiro Yamagata marks a dramatic shift in aesthetic in his new series titled Transient. Known through the eighties and nineties as a master of Pop spectacle, Yamagata transforms his passion for dialogue between macrocosmic and microcosmic considerations into a distinctly new pictorial domain. The result is a profoundly introspective examination of the collective and individual psychic template. This interface is depicted in hauntingly beautiful works done in black and white on hand-made rice paper attached to canvas. Often monumental in scale, these works convey a sense of timelessness and impart an isolation that is both compelling and forbidding. This series speaks to the issue of time, place and perspective while its elements insinuate an unfolding apocalyptic splendor which lies just beneath or above our dimension. A global force in contemporary art for over thirty years, Yamagata stakes a claim in new philosophical terrain with this historic series of somber abstractions. The work calls upon his rich heritage and imbues it with his visionary grasp of the metaphysical and the spiritual. He couples this with an exacting mastery of technique and media to great theatrical effect. BL

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Hiro Yamagata : Website

Hiro Yamagata : Bill Lowe Gallery

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