Posts Tagged ‘absence

11
Sep
11

Rachel Whiteread : Sculpture

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‘Untitled (Rubber Torso)’
High Density Rubber
3 1/2 x 7 1/8 x 10 3/8 in
1994

‘Index’
Plaster (two units)
10 5/8 x 11 5/8 x 10 1/4 in
2005

‘Hold’
Plaster, wood and aluminum
9 1/4 x 23 5/8 x 9 7/8 in
2005

‘Cabinet II’
Metal and plaster (one metal cupboard and 43 plaster units)
17 3/4 x 18 1/2 x 17 1/2 in
2006

‘Study’
Plaster and wood
36 x 73 5/8 x 21 1/4 in
2005

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The artist Rachel Whiteread creates elegant and poetic sculptures which explore architecture, space, absence and memory. Often inspired by the physicality of the human body, her works are poignant for their exploration of intimate domestic spaces and household objects. Whiteread typically uses industrial materials such as plaster, resin and rubber to cast the negative space surrounding or within an object – the murky darkness beneath a bed frame, the void within a humble cardboard box, the space in and around a myriad collection of books. The resulting sculptures retain the texture and shape of the original objects, yet are eerie ghosts of their former selves.

Whiteread is perhaps best known for several large-scale public commissions such as House, a sculpture cast from the interior of a condemned Victorian house in London’ s East End, Water Tower, a resin cast of the water towers ubiquitous to the New York City skyline, Monument, an inverted pedestal placed upon an empty plinth in Trafalgar Square and the Holocaust Memorial in Vienna, an impenetrable library of books turned inwards in commemoration of the thousands of Austrian Jews who perished during World War II. Like her smaller sculptures, these monumental works are distinguished by their minimalist sensibility and their capacity to evoke stillness and contemplation.

Rachel Whiteread has a long list of international distinctions which include winning the 1993 Turner Prize for House, representing Great Britain in the 1997 Venice Biennale and presenting solo exhibitions at such prestigious institutions as the Kunsthalle Basel, the Reina Sofia, The Serpentine Gallery and the Deutsche Guggenheim. Her work is housed in museums and private collections around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, the Tate Modern, London and the Centre Pompidou, Paris. The artist lives and works in London, England. [Bio]

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Rachel Whiteread : Luhring Augustine

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01
Nov
10

Mayumi Terada : ‘Dollhouses’ (Photography)

‘Window with Trees and Cup’
gelatin silver print
40.5 x 55 inches
2006

Skylight and Ladder
gelatin silver print
54.5 x 40 inches
2005

Eggs on Glass table
gelatin silver print
20 x 24 inches
2007

‘View of Blossoms from Basement’
gelatin silver print
40.5 x 55 inches
2008

‘Rocking Chair and Window’
gelatin silver print
40.5 x 55 inches
2005

‘View of Moon and Bottle ‘
gelatin silver print
20 x 24 inches
2007

There is a feeling of distinct absence about these spaces, a lingering absence, an intentional view of a reality that once existed, but has since disappeared. Terada’s photographs defer any rational sense of scale, lending a peculiar, less than ordinary, perspective to the rooms and an uncanny sense of proportion. Her practice is a composite of self-taught techniques that belong equally to sculpture, painting, architecture, and photography. Together they work to express a profound tension of time and space, emitting a mystery that purposely eludes our sensory perception. Terada constructs her dollhouse rooms from foam-core, cardboard, and wood, with tiny furnishings cut and glued from paper, fabrics, plastic, and metals. The end result is not these intimate constructions in themselves, but the black-and-white photograph that Terada makes of it, using only natural light. Like childhood doll’s play, Terada’s miniature sanctuaries are contemplative reflections that refer both directly and indirectly to the body. The conceptual aspect of her work oscillates between the virtual and tactile realities that underpin contemporary life. What is curious about these photographs is the extent to which their visual tensions depend on the coordination of hand and eye. [Extract : ‘Mayumi Terada’ by Robert C. Morgan]

Mayumi Terada : Robert Miller Gallery

Mayumi Terada : James Hyman Gallery

07
Jul
10

Eva Hesse : Artist

“Confidence in my understanding of formal aesthetics is not the problem.
Those things are solvable. I solved them beautifully”. (Eva Hesse)

H + H
1965 (June)
Varnish, ink, gouache, enamel, cord, metal, wood, papier-câché,
unknown modeling compound, particle board, wood

Oomamaboomba
1965 (May)
Tempera, enamel, rope, cord, metal,
unknown modeling compound, particle board, wood

Sans II (One Unit)
October 1968
Fiberglass and polyester resin

Aught
1968
Latex, canvas, polyethylene sheeting, rope and unidentified materials; metal grommets
Installation variable, 4 units

Contingent
November 1969
Fiberglass, polyester resin, latex, cheesecloth

Right After
1969
Fiberglass, polyester resin, wire

Expanded Expansion
1969
Reinforced fiberglass poles and rubberized cheesecloth.

Eva Hesse was one of the great artists of the 1960s, and her major sculptural works stand out as singular achievements of that era. At once drawing on Minimalist strategies of repetition and seriality, and pushing non-traditional materials toward new modes of expression, Hesse created an art that evoked emotion, absence, and contingency. [Extract : The Jewish Museum]

The Estate Of Eva Hesse




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
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