Posts Tagged ‘abandoned

21
Mar
12

Kevin J Miyazaki : ‘Fast Food’ Series (Photography)

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‘Out to Lunch’
Highway 94 Location
Photograph
2006
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‘Absence’
S. Broadway Avenue Location
Photograph
2010
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‘Fast and Loose’
Highway 51 Location
Photograph
2009
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‘Empty/Plenty’
Okemos Road Location
Photograph
2008
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‘Success’
Jones Blvd Location
Photograph
2008
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‘Front Row’
Homer Adams Parkway Location
Photograph
2009
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‘Outside in’
I-75 Location
Photograph
2009
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The series ‘Fast Food’ (2004 – Present) tracks the visual imprint made by the American fast food restaurant on our cultural landscape. These are unsentimental spaces created through corporate analysis of demographics, traffic flow and consumer desire. Yet the spaces have become a familiar comfort to us, quasi-public places experienced widely across common divisions of geography, race and class. The act of eating is pleasurable and intimate, even in these created consumer spaces. When they close, their transformation to urban relic is fast and impersonal, without even a semblance of corporate procedure – often, hand written notes are posted, interiors are disheveled, lights are left on.

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Kevin J Miyazaki : Website

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29
Jan
12

Georges Rousse : ‘Site-Specific Installations’

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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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Georges Rousse
Site-Specific Installation
Photograph
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After he discovered Land Art and Malevich’s Black Square against a white field, Georges Rousse altered his relationship to photography, inventing a unique approach that shifted the relationship of painting to space. He began making installations in the types of abandoned or derelict buildings that have long held an attraction for him – creating ephemeral, one-of-a-kind artworks by transforming these sites into pictorial spaces that are visible only in his photographs.

Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas. His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, that of creating a photographic image.

In these empty spaces, Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world–his imaginary “universe.” His creation both expresses his artistic intentions and resonates with his impressions of the site, its history and its culture. Finally, this results in a photograph, a flat plane, so the shapes he paints and draws, and the volumes and architectural constructions he creates in those massive spaces seem fractured or split on different levels. His photo brings together painting, architecture, and drawing. It carves out a new space in which the artist’s fictive world becomes visible. At the heart of this questioning, his work deals with our relationship to Space and Time. [Extract : Bio]

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Georges Rousse : Website

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23
Jan
12

Alexa Meyerman : ‘Photo Objects’

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’10:25 AM’
inkjet : transparency film
15 x 20 x 15 cm
2010
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’10:25 AM’
inkjet : transparency film
15 x 20 x 15 cm
2010
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’10:12 AM’
inkjet : transparency film
13 x 12 x 13 cm
2010
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‘Wormhole’
3D photo installation
variable
2011
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’11:25 AM’
inkjet : transparency film
29 x 21 x 15 cm
2011
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’11:30 AM’
3 D photo installation
variable
2011
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The transparent photo-objects can be seen as deconstructions. In spite of traces of human presense, what these models have in common is that they are either empty or temporarily abandoned. Like in memories or dreams, the buildings are reconstructed, some details have been emphasised others are dissolving or dissolved. The concepts of interior and exterior become interchangeable.

One can look in and around the objects, and then they will transform, depending on the incidence of light or point of view, which results in the appearance, or disappearance of exits, entrances or rooms. Unavoidably you have to approach the buildings closely, but you cannot hide in these idle constructions, which after all in the end, only consist of light and darkness. – [Extract : About the Work]

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Alexa Meyerman : Website

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15
Dec
11

Alni Stalke : ‘[Ex]Pride’ Series (Photography)

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‘[Ex]Pride’ Series
archival ink prints
50cm x 50cm
2004-08
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‘[Ex]Pride’ Series
archival ink prints
50cm x 50cm
2004-08
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‘[Ex]Pride’ Series
archival ink prints
50cm x 50cm
2004-08
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‘[Ex]Pride’ Series
archival ink prints
50cm x 50cm
2004-08
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‘[Ex]Pride’ Series
archival ink prints
50cm x 50cm
2004-08
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‘[Ex]Pride’ Series
archival ink prints
50cm x 50cm
2004-08
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‘[Ex]Pride’ Series
archival ink prints
50cm x 50cm
2004-08
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Industry in Soviet times was one of supreme pride and supporting points of Soviet ideology. After the nineties, when the Soviet Union collapsed, the great part of factories underwent difficult economical crisis because of various reasons. Raw materials of goods and prime cost of energy rapidly increased though society’s purchasing ability remained the same as well as manufactured production in its quality dropped behind imported goods from western countries. Even now, years after, the larger half of corps of old factories are sold and used as warehouses, or they just remain empty and vandalized.

The theme ‘Pride’ in my essay of photographs is interpreted as [Ex] Pride, having a look in interiors of factories and carrying a subjective visual research about former pride. As the essence in my photographs I have used inner environment of factories what even now doesn’t seem to be lifeless and goes on with its inner quiet life. …Noise of dropping water, wind in broken windows, old posters and documents, books from soviet times, personal belongings of workers…

I didn’t look for anything specific. I put my focus more on symbolic and broadly interpreted things and compositions what would be possible to understand with wide comprehension and in multi-levels. From my childhood I remember times when sirens in mornings and evenings announced beginning and end of a working day, and I remember times when suddenly closed territories of factories became approachable to anybody.

A great part of my youth passed in these forsaken corps and it was one of the main subjective motives why I choose this exact visual interpretation for the concept ‘pride’. Nowadays people who come here are very different. These are children and teenagers who come here to play, or have fun vandalizing. There are also people who try to find something useful for household or selling. – [Extract : [Ex]Pride]

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Alni Stalke : Website

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18
Nov
10

Ulf Puder : Paintings

‘Mondsegel’
oil on linen
80″ x 83″
2008

‘Wind von hinten’
Oil on canvas
120 x 130 cm
2008

‘Eröffnung’
Oil on canvas
210 x 170 cm
2007

‘Stromung’
Oil on canvas
100 x 100 cm
2005

‘Sand’
Oil on canvas
67″ x 98.5″
2005

‘Neue Insel’
Oil on canvas
150 x 210 cm
2005

Ulf Puder was born in Leipzig, 1958 where he currently lives and works. Puder belongs to the first tier of famous graduates from the Leipziger Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst (Academy of Visual Arts) and along with his peer, Neo Rauch, he was on the forefront of painters creating a new vocabulary that combined the neo-realism prevalent in the former Eastern Germany with a surrealistic bent.

Ulf Puder’s paintings describe the artist’s unique imaginary world of desolate and haunting environments populated only by abandoned architecture and rendered in his signature muted palette. Tents, mobile homes, churches, train cars and other recreational spaces that should be occupied are left emptied and silent. Bungalows float on makeshift platforms within flooded streets; other structures seem to be in the midst of a storm. Natural disasters come to mind – places that have recently seen the unthinkable and have been left uninhabitable. [Extract : Ulf Puder : Kavi Gupta Gallery]

Ulf Puder : Dogenhaus Galerie Leipzig

Ulf Puder : Artcore Gallery




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