Posts Tagged ‘texture

21
Aug
12

Black Opal : Photography

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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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Black Opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2011
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2010
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2009
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2010
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2010
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black opal

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“black opal”
photograph
2012
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Innocent

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“innocent”
photograph
2010
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Black Opal : Flickr

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30
Jul
12

Mario Giacomelli : “Sea and Landscapes” Series

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“No image can be “reality” because reality it happens only once before my eyes.” Mario Giacomelli

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“Sea series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Landscapes Series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Landscapes Series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Landscapes Series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Landscapes Series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Landscapes Series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Sea series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Sea series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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“Sea series”
Mario Giacomelli
Photograph
1953-63
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The image is spirit, matter, time, space, time for eyes. Traces are tests of ourselves and the sign of a culture that lives constantly rhythms that govern memory, history, standards of knowledge.” – M.Giacomelli

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Mario Giacomelli : Website

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10
Jul
12

Reiko Imoto : ‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series (Photography)

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Reiko has a unique eye and her works look mysterious and surreal, yet the subject matter that she captures are from her everyday life. Inspired by her own inner reality, subconscious world, dreams, childhood memories, psychology, Surrealist paintings and films, fairytales, music, poetry, and every single ordinary thing she sees that give her many perspectives. She is mostly interested in things which we only can see when our eyes are closed, such as dreams, memories, imagination, and so on. [Profile]

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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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‘Dreams of The Amnesiac’ Series
Gelatin silver prints
11 x 14 inches
2008
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This body of work is about my feeling of forgetting. Sometimes I cannot remember my dream after waking up, even though I know I had a dream and I try to recall it very much. What I remember is only a feeling or mood from the dream without visual evidence. I try to imagine things, or people’s faces as the keywords that might have been in the dream. However, there is only a mood of mystery, melancholia, nostalgia, or happiness remaining in my mind; as if I remember the smell of a particular food, but I do not remember what the food could be at all. In such occasions, I feel as if my memories and dreams are trapped in a “drawer” of my subconscious mind and I cannot find a “key” to open it and to see inside, where there would be something important for myself. I imagine that people who have amnesia must feel something like that all the time. I once had a chance to ask a question to a psychologist who studies dreams, “Do amnesiacs have dreams of their old memories?” The psychologist answered me, “Yes. They have such dreams, but they never remember what they dreamt about.” Throughout this project, I have tried to express my own feelings of a forgotten, unknown memory, imagining an atmosphere of dream visions that would never have remained in an amnesiac’s memory. Exploring the feeling of forgetting might not be as valuable as focusing on exploring the feeling of remembering in our lives. However, recognizing the existence of forgetting, as a part of the workings of the mind, might set us free from our own “mind drawers”. – Reiko Imoto : Artists Statement

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Reiko Imoto : Website

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05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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04
Jul
12

Issei Suda : Photography

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‘Untitled (Sunflower)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Girl on swing)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Clouds)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kuroishi, Aomori, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Eyes and bicycles)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kanda, Tokyo, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Woman behind flowers)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Skirt)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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Issei Suda’s complex portraits and street scenes reveal his intense interest in the mysterious side of everyday life and otherworldliness. His first notable book and exhibition ‘Fushi Kaden’ (transmission of the flower of acting style} was a series based on the fifteenth-century treatise by ‘Zeami’ on the principles of ‘No theatre.’ Suda, a devout student of Zeami, translates the treatise in photographs that return to an emotional landscape that predates the rise of cities produced on his trips to remote locations in Japan from 1971 – 1978. Often his photographs are suspended in time, either one moment too soon or too late, allowing for an unsettling effect on the viewer. His fascination continues in photographic scenes remembered from days past and preserved regardless of time. His series include people who dress up for festivals, dreamlike landscapes and studies of pattern, texture and beauty. [X]

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Issei Suda : Higher Pictures

Issei Suda : Charles A Hartman

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23
Jun
12

Ezra Stoller : Architectural Photography

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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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TWA Terminal, Eero Saarinen, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1962
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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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Guggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1959
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Louis Isidore Kahn, Olivetti Underwood Factory, Harrisburg
Gelatin Silver Print
Ezra Stoller
1966-1970
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Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1963
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Milwaukee War Memorial, Eero Saarinen
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1952
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Ezra Stoller’s gelatin silver prints include images of architectural interiors and iconic landmarks. Based on his background in architecture and industrial design, Stoller used a large-format camera to photograph monumental 20th century buildings, including the Guggenheim Museum, the TWA terminal at Idlewild Airport (now John F. Kennedy International Airport), the Seagram Building, the Salk Institute, Yale Art and Architecture Building and Fallingwater. In addition to well-known photographs of these locations, these works also include lesser-known photographs of small homes and guest houses which provide a fresh look at the masterful eye that established Stoller as the preeminent photographer of modern architecture. A pioneer in the field of architectural photography, Ezra Stoller was commissioned by architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph, Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Marcel Breuer and Richard Meier, because of his unique ability to capture the building according to the architect’s vision and to lock it into the architectural canon. His photographs convey a three-dimensional experience of architectural space through a two-dimensional medium, with careful attention to vantage point and lighting condition, as well as line, color, form and texture. – [Extract : Press Release - Yossi Milo Gallery]

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Ezra Stoller : Yossi Milo Gallery

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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