Posts Tagged ‘surface

30
Nov
12

James Bourret : “Winter’s Veil” Series (Photography)

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“I seek to create richly evocative, emotional images from nature,
reflecting the mood, form, colors, and patterns of a scene.” J Bourret

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‘Winter’s Veil’ #10
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #26
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #28
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #27
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #2
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #7
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #7
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #6
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #44
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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The water’s edge has been a source of fascination for me since I can remember. The changing landscape, the effects of current and water volume, light, and temperature all make the river’s edge different from day to day. Seasonal progression brings further changes, with winter bringing the growing and changing veil of ice along the bank, increasing until the surface is solid. Even then, the ice changes in shape and transparency on a daily basis, thinning, clearing, cracking, buckling, melting and freezing again, and eventually moving tectonically downstream.

These highly abstract images seek to transcend boundaries of formal and scale recognition. Flowing lines and curved forms in the ice are interrupted by spiky, angular forms and layered textures. The seemingly random crystalline forms and structures evoke associations with landforms (aerial photography) and microcrystalline structures (photomicrography) and leave room for endless possibilities of interpretation. Therefore, as a photographer, they offer the opportunity to find and make strongly graphic yet highly detailed, rich images. [artist statement]

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James Bourret : Portfolio

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27
Nov
12

Cathrin Schulz : “Poolside” Series (Photography)

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POOLSIDE is a series which is part of a long-term project called AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA documenting my vision of America as a German Photographer. Immersing myself in the urban scenery of the United States I perceive its authenticity and diverseness’ and embrace it in soul places. With POOLSIDE I sense a piece of Atlanta’s soul, discovering a part of its culture. The series’ subject matter is a community pool. A location of diverse social environments. It was a collective, public experience to capture it. The energy of the pools, a flat continuation of water obscuring what’s below the surface, was a distinctive emotional atmosphere, sensed intuitively: solitary, still and private. [artist statement]

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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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I spend a lot of time finding the perfect place, the purest energy. I return several times to capture an unusual situation – without staging a setting. The images are captured with one and the same camera, no filter, usually short exposure times, same lens. Through the formal reduction and accentuation of particular colors in my photographs, and by using a reduced visual language, careful choice of motifs and precise cropping of the image, I condense singular moments in their own authenticity. The clarity is intensified further through digital manipulation. By heightening contrasts, colors and saturations, I allow individual details and structures that would otherwise escape our attention to emerge in palpable relief. The black background provides a blank canvas, and isolates the subject from time and distance. The aesthetic qualities of my subject matter are placed in the foreground. ~ [ Cathrin Schulz : Process ]

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Cathrin Schulz : Website

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23
Aug
12

antonia low : “gewicht des sehens” installation (on paper)

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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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The exhibition pavillion designed by the Irish artist Stephen Craig is set inside an old factory building. The floor of the pavillion is covered entirely with mirror glass and a black spray-painted scaffolding is installed on top of the fragile surface. The modernistic architecture of the building, which refers to Mies van de Rohe‘s pavillion, is reflected in the floor. The visitiors can see themselves, the space from the top of the scaffolding structure and observe the entire space in a completely different way. But through the installation and with each movement of the spectators the weight of the structure cause a continous destruction of the mirror surface. A few scaffolding elements are even thrown over onto the cracking glass while other elements remain either partly constructed or partly deconstructed in the space. Seeing their own reflections the spectators become aware of themselves, they see the caused damage and realise that the perfection was gone instantly, or had never even been achieved. [Extract]

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Antonia Low : Website

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05
May
12

Alison Rossiter : ‘Reduction’ (Minimalist Diptychs)

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‘Nepera Velox’
expired August 1906
processed in 2010
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‘Nepera Velox’
expired August 1906
processed in 2010
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‘Nepera Velox’
expired August 1906
processed in 2010
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‘Nepera Velox’
expired August 1906
processed in 2010
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‘Haloid Xerox Varaloid’
expired August 1932
processed in 2010
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‘Haloid Xerox Varaloid’
expired August 1932
processed in 2010
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‘Haloid Xerox Varaloid’
expired August 1932
processed in 2010
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Alison Rossiter’s photographs are created without a camera on expired, vintage photo paper. The artist experiments with gelatin silver papers she collects from throughout the 20th century, making controlled marks by pouring or pooling photographic developer directly onto the surface of the paper. Dark forms emerge which often resemble mountainous landscapes or active tornados; other shapes are paired by the artist to create minimalist diptychs. Each batch of gelatin silver paper, such as Eastman Royal Bromide, which expired in 1919, or Nepera- Velox, which expired in 1906, possesses unique qualities, depending on its particular color, surface, condition and age. Utilizing her experience in conserving photographs, she reacts to these variables and manipulates the interaction of paper and developer by hand, paying tribute to the intrinsic qualities of photographic materials and reintroducing unpredictability into a process which is now commonly digitized. – Extract: Reduction – Yossi Milo Gallery

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Alison Rossiter : Website

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01
Apr
12

Tanja Rochelmeyer : Geometric Paintings

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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
100 x 140 cm
2009
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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
110 x 180 cm
2010
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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
120 x 160 cm
2010
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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
70 x 100 cm
2011
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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
70 x 100 cm
2011
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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
110 x 180 cm
2009
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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
140 x 200 cm
2009
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‘Untitled’
Tanja Rochelmeyer
130 x 180 cm
2011
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Tanja Rochelmeyer : Website

Tanja Rochelmeyer : Loop

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17
Mar
12

Eva Hild : ‘Ceramic Sculptures’

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Influence, pressure, strain. These words have been the foundation for my current projects that comprise communicating the theme in large, hand-built clay forms. Delicate continuously flowing entities in thinbuilt clay. They reflect varying degrees of external and internal pressures, and how, as a consequence, perception of inner and outer space is changed or challenged.” ~ Eva Hild

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‘Structure 3′
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2007
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‘Bound’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
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‘Sinuous’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
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‘Cohere’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2009
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‘Untitled’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2006
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‘Bulge’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
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‘Untitled’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
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‘Sprawl’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
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Artist Statement

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My sculptures are bodies, exposed to pressure and movements. On one hand, it is the mass in thin layers, running in a meander-like closed movement. On the other hand it is the empty space, air and light forming volumes, described by the contures of the mass. The construction is really made of the absent; the emptiness, the holes of air. The obvious body just defines the volume. My fascination is about the relationship between the internal and external realities; the dualism between inside and outside, content and form, feeling and shape, impression and expression. The shape consists of continuously flowing inner and outer surfaces, with one line running through the form. Inside turns outside and the loop gives the sculpture its uniformity and identity. The empty space is drawn into the form and becomes one with it; the air fills the cavities.

It is a reflection of my inner landscapes of form. Everyday, I experience the tension between presence and absence. The anxiety I feel is both constructive and destructive. My sculptures show me the necessity of opposites; they are paradoxes. Bodies where presence and absence meet. The clay is the prerequisite for creating space, and space is the prerequisite for the form of clay. Empty space as well as clay are my materials. I feel a great freedom in hand-building. It grows slowly, I have time to reflect, I can change direction, make connections and have a smooth surface with the same thickness. When the form is ready and the clay is dry, I sand away at the surface. The pieces are fired twice in stoneware temperature, around 1200°C and finally treated with silicate colour and pigments.” – [Texts]

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Eva Hild : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
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