Posts Tagged ‘structure

04
Dec
12

William Klein : “Painted Contact Sheets” Series

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“The idea for the colour and graphics comes from the red lines
photographers put around their choices on a contact sheet.” W.K.

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106442

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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William Klein_gordas

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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William-Klein-Dakar-school’s-out-1985.-Painted-contact-1998-640x537

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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Gun-Gun-Gun-New-York-19551-640x533

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5177807247_8597808736_b-640x533

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5177807969_4d01b3b81a_z

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5178409896_ce6bac97ae_b

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5178408408_2a6ef687de_b

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
24 x 20″
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Klein returned to still photography in the 1980’s, ever progressive and unrelenting in his approach. Revisiting his work to that date, he made large-scale blow-ups of his photographic contact sheets, revealing on an unparalleled scale the frames before and after the decisive image. Liberally applying gloss brush strokes in bold colours to these mural-sized prints, Klein brought together key elements from his long career: graphic form, composition and colour from the early murals and paintings juxtaposed with ground-breaking fashion and street photos, along with the narrative and bold visual language of his experimental films. A defining moment where his unique vision came full circle. – Extract

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William Klein + Daido Moriyama : Tate Modern – Exhibition

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19
Mar
12

Dani Subagja : ‘Hong Kong’ Series (Street Photography)

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“In my opinion, black & white photos are somehow more able to tell the depth of a story; something beyond the colour (black & white) itself, since it might be easier to get disrupted by the colours of a photo. I agree both colour and black & white work better for certain subjects. I think colour photos describe the subject while black & white photos narrate the subject. Additional to that, I guess it has to do with personal taste. I find black & white photos appeal to me and inspire me more.” ~ Dani Subagja

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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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‘HK Series’
Dani Subagja
Photograph
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I like exploring places and documenting them. I take my camera with me wherever I go, not necessarily aiming to take a photograph, it’s just always in my bag. Since a street journey comes with a unique environment and unpredictable encounters most of the time, for me it’s impossible to get completely uninterested, even with very familiar places. The challenge is familiar places often entrap me by keeping me taking photographs with too similar scenes. This can be boring sometimes. And new places, although they may bear some resemblance with familiar places, mostly excite and refresh me. Structures, geometries, alleys and distinctive moments are among my “favorite captures”. Dani Subagja

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Dani Subagja : WordPress

An Interview with Dani Subagja

Places: Dani Subagja’s Street Journey

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29
Feb
12

Ishimoto Yasuhiro : ‘Katsura Imperial Villa’ (Photography)

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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘I feel that there is a kind of fateful link between Bauhaus and me. I would like to donate fifty-five of my photographs to the Bauhaus Archive Berlin’, said Ishimoto Yasuhiro in a letter to the Bauhaus Archive…

Born in San Francisco, the son of Japanese immigrants, Ishimoto was trained as a photographer at the Chicago Institute of Design. He numbers among the few people who have ever received permission to photograph the interior and exterior spaces of the centuries-old architectural complex. The photos were mainly taken in the early 1950s and early 1980s. They portray the building, which was praised as exemplary by the architects Walter Gropius and Bruno Taut, within an intentionally modernist approach.

Many of the photographs that were mainly shot by Ishimoto in May 1954 were published in 1960 in the photobook Katsura together with texts by Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius and the Japanese architect Kenzo Tange. The images deviate from the conventional standards of architectural photography, making no attempt to portray representative features. They show an eye for detail, often as abstract compositions in which lines organize the surface structure and textures fill the spaces between them…

The palace is segmented by Ishimoto into flat patterns that consist solely of grey tonal values. However, the subject of the photo always remains recognizable. Ishimoto fully exploits the available techniques of black-and-white photography with its dense black tones. His approach seems appropriate to the subject, yet also distant. [Ex : Between Japanese tradition and Western modernism]

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Remembering Modernisms Roots

Museum of Contemporary Art

Stephen Daiter Gallery

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22
Feb
12

Roberta Vilić : Paintings

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‘Untitled’
Roberta Vilic
Painting
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‘Untitled’
Roberta Vilic
Painting
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‘Untitled’
Roberta Vilic
Painting
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‘Untitled’
Roberta Vilic
Painting
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‘Untitled’
Roberta Vilic
Painting
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‘Untitled’
Roberta Vilic
Painting
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‘Untitled’
Roberta Vilic
Painting
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Works of Roberta Vilić act as “fields of memory (reminiscence)“- they are places of intimate, symbolical exchange, where private perception transforms into a visual code. “The work itself is a screen of the authors interior“, wrote Janja Feric for the occasion of Roberta Vilic’s exhibition in gallery Galežnica end 2002. Evocational character of the matter transforms the painting surface into a suggestive field. In the tactile game of associations, from structure of the matter itself rise or disperse diagrams and traces. Leaving an imprint of time eroded walls and evocate a metaphorical picture of passing of time.

Moreover, Roberta’s works constitute researches of space and surface/plane, structure, matter, and material. These are abstract compositions of reduced coloring, summarized to approbation of patterns of monochrome surfaces, grey, black or white, they are close to minimalism, and they address void and surface as central figures, activating the relation between positive and negative. On the surface of the painting, layer closest to the observer, one can sense words or letters as the only reference to the world of externality, and which in subsequent elaborations and research loses its narrative character by becoming an unobtrusive symbol, and by adopting abstract character of the sign. During this sublimation process a shift is apparent, deep ponderation, which results with cumulative sense of easement of the structure, its purification and appeasement.

The new works are produced in the continuity of the author’s expression, certain form-content patterns, and visible close communication with the heritage of informell. In time we find revelations and researches of a technical nature. Alongside parts of text and letters, cuts, scratches, ruptures and gaps appear as peer elements. The author addresses them as one does a graphical matrix. These are all messages inserted in the matter and contribute its expressive power and re-evaluation of our comprehension of elementary world of matter. Without evocating objective signs and symbols by principle of tautology. By conceptualization of reduction and recurrence methods, in almost monotone repetitiveness rhythm and change are bought by minimal and discreet shifts which emphasize uniqueness of multi-layered structure of each individual work. – Extract: Branka Benčić – Marisall Gallery

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Roberta Vilić : Marisall Galerija

Roberta Vilić : More Works

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10
Feb
12

Jai Llewellyn : ‘Inks’ Series (Works on Paper)

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‘What goes up must come down’
Ink & graphite on paper
40 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Immobility’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘The calm after the storm’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Hot on your heels’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘The land that time forgot’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Swiftly moving on’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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“My work is diverse. Predominantly I work in the field of abstract expressionism. The foundation of my work comes from an intensive study of the ‘nude’ and although the formal representation of the figure has completely vanished from my practice, there is an underlying system or structure that has it’s roots in the abstraction of the human form. I rarely plan or rehearse a piece, working intuitively I allow an image to evolve naturally, to have a life of its own. I am interested in the idea that when something is destroyed another is simultaneously created, as in reincarnation or rebirth. I often use surfaces that have previously been worked on, rather than a blank canvas, I react to existing marks or images. Working in this way produces results that I could not plan for or even imagine, and it is important that the ingredient which attracted me in the first instance is not completely lost but given a new life. Often I leave some of the original elements to pay respect to its contribution.” Jai Llewellyn : Artist Statement

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Jai Llewellyn : Website

Jai Llewellyn : RedBubble

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04
Feb
12

Mary Christiansen : ‘Multi Plate Etchings’ (Prints)

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‘Himmerland’
multi-plate etching
107 x 107 cm
2008
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‘Untitled 2′
multi-plate etching
16.5 x 18.5 cm
2008
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‘Shadow line’
multi-plate etching
15.5 x 16.5 cm
2008
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‘Tilt’
multi-plate etching
19.5 x 20 cm
2008
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‘Untitled’
multi-plate etching
18 x 20 cm
2007
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‘Untitled’
multi-plate etching
15.5 x 17 cm
2007
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My pre-occupation as an artist is with creating highly distilled, contemplative nuances of feeling in print. I aim to compose images – drawn from nature and memory – of stark yet tactile forms, held momentarily out of balance; forms disappearing into immaterial shadows and configurations of form in spatial settings, undergoing transformation. I’m fascinated by forms appearing like projections onto surfaces, fragile and immaterial articulations, punctuated by the interplay of light and shade. Re-discovering delicate forms in space at distances defined by rhythm and structure, are of interest to me.

My objective is to create a state of suspension of individual elements, caught in a complex of layers with deceptive simplicity. The creation of these images is intuitive in nature. The creative process is ongoing, with every intuition, reflection and configuration, pre-figuring another possibility. The printing process is an integral part of my working process. The separation and building up of layers, multiple overprinting, the use of inks of differing viscosities – these modifications inform the work as it evolves. The tactile qualities of print-making, the depth and richness of surface, are crucial. – [Artists Statement]

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Mary Christiansen : Hughson Gallery

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