Posts Tagged ‘sculpture

16
Aug
12

U-Ram Choe : ‘Custos Cavum’ (Sculpture Video)

::

::

Custos Cavum, 2011
size : 220(h) x 360(w) x 260(d)cm
material : metallic material, resin, motor, gear, custom CPU board, LED

::

Once upon a time, there were two worlds. Each connected to the other through a number of small holes, as if the worlds were breathing through these holes. However, the holes had a tendency to close up, so there were guardians next to each one to keep them open. The guardians were called “Custos Cavum.” They took the form of seals and had large front teeth, which they used to gnaw the holes to prevent them from closing up. Whenever a Custos Cavum felt the generation of a new hole somewhere, it fell into a deep sleep. From the body of the quietly sleeping Custos Cavum grew winged spores called “Unicuses.” These spores took flight and each flew to a new hole, giving rise to a new Custos Cavum. As time went on, the people of each world forgot about the other. The guardians lost their power and died. When the last Custos Cavum died, the last hole closed, separating the two worlds completely. The existence of the other world was entirely erased from people’s memories. – [X]

::

U-Ram Choe : Website

U-Ram Choe : Vimeo

::

17
Mar
12

Eva Hild : ‘Ceramic Sculptures’

::

Influence, pressure, strain. These words have been the foundation for my current projects that comprise communicating the theme in large, hand-built clay forms. Delicate continuously flowing entities in thinbuilt clay. They reflect varying degrees of external and internal pressures, and how, as a consequence, perception of inner and outer space is changed or challenged.” ~ Eva Hild

::

::
‘Structure 3′
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2007
::

::
‘Bound’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
::

::
‘Sinuous’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
::

::
‘Cohere’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2009
::

::
‘Untitled’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2006
::

::
‘Bulge’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
::

::
‘Untitled’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
::

::
‘Sprawl’
Ceramic Sculpture
Eva Hild
2010
::

Artist Statement

::

My sculptures are bodies, exposed to pressure and movements. On one hand, it is the mass in thin layers, running in a meander-like closed movement. On the other hand it is the empty space, air and light forming volumes, described by the contures of the mass. The construction is really made of the absent; the emptiness, the holes of air. The obvious body just defines the volume. My fascination is about the relationship between the internal and external realities; the dualism between inside and outside, content and form, feeling and shape, impression and expression. The shape consists of continuously flowing inner and outer surfaces, with one line running through the form. Inside turns outside and the loop gives the sculpture its uniformity and identity. The empty space is drawn into the form and becomes one with it; the air fills the cavities.

It is a reflection of my inner landscapes of form. Everyday, I experience the tension between presence and absence. The anxiety I feel is both constructive and destructive. My sculptures show me the necessity of opposites; they are paradoxes. Bodies where presence and absence meet. The clay is the prerequisite for creating space, and space is the prerequisite for the form of clay. Empty space as well as clay are my materials. I feel a great freedom in hand-building. It grows slowly, I have time to reflect, I can change direction, make connections and have a smooth surface with the same thickness. When the form is ready and the clay is dry, I sand away at the surface. The pieces are fired twice in stoneware temperature, around 1200°C and finally treated with silicate colour and pigments.” – [Texts]

::

Eva Hild : Website

::

11
Mar
12

Sabine Hornig : ‘Windows’ Series (Photography)

::

From the inception of her work in the late 1990s, Sabine Horning has engaged in exploring specific spatial and perspectival concerns and the blurring of the distinctions between two-dimensional and three-dimensional space. Employing photography and sculpture in equal measure throughout her practice, Hornig supports and expands each of these mediums by cross-referencing one with the other.

::

::
‘Radically Reduce’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 183 cm
2004
::

::
‘No. 9′
C-print on Perspex
140 x 189 cm
2007
::

::
‘No. 10′
C-print on Perspex
130 x 177 cm
2007
::

::
‘Kleines Fenster’
C-print on Glass
80 x 116 cm
2009
::

::
‘No. 12′
C-print on Glass
115 x 142 cm
2009
::

::
‘No. 11′
C-print on Perspex
150 x 200 cm
2007
::

::
‘Window with No Floor’
C-print on Perspex
140 x 195 cm
2006
::

For Sabine Hornig, the window represents a basic, transparent, grid-like system that incorporates her ideas on the gaze, view and perspective, which oscillate between image and sculpture. Hornig finds the windows she uses in her photographs incidentally in modern cities, mostly in Berlin. Intentionally made visible or invisible, the window functions as a prevalent frame that contains certain flows, a certain motility between interior and exterior, public and private, transparency and distortion, open and closed space, and associated with this last pairing of terms, flight and confinement.

Through her activity of foregrounding the transparency (rather than the transparentness) of the palimpsestual threshold of the glass/window in her photographs, Hornig obliges us to become aware of glass (by means of Plexiglas) as a complex structure, a responsive surface and the window as a doubling boundary. In her recent suite of photographs of vacant shop windows, the artist not only expands on our awareness of the optics of the window as a sill, but raises these abandoned commercial spaces from their state of quiescent limbo to places where, in their emptiness, we are given reign to imagine past identity and future existence, where our emotions swing between melancholy and hope in the face of our ever-changing, mutant cities. – [Press Release: 'Landscape Negative' 2007]

::

Sabine Hornig : Website

::

10
Mar
12

Annie Woodford : Ceramics

::

‘Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere’

Blaise Pascal, mathematician, poet and philosopher.

::

::
‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
46 x 12 x 12 cm
2009
::

::
‘Silent Constrainer’
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
38 x 24 x 18 cm
2008
::

::
‘Slice’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
16 x 12 x 20 cm
2010
::

::
‘Veiled Core’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
30 x 30 x 25 cm
2010
::

::
‘Encapsulator’
Porcelain, nylon mono-filament
alternative view
2009
::

::
‘Splinter 1′
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
2009
::

::
‘Splinter 1′
Porcelain, copper, stainless steel
30 x 30 x 24 cm
Detail, 2009
::

Artist Statement

::

Intrigued by the tenuous connection between past, present and future and the shadowy, illusive meaning of time, Annie Woodford makes work that is both haunting and enigmatic. Shifting boundaries between science and metaphysics and an enduring interest in parallel universe theory instill the pieces with a heightened intensity, whilst an obsession with hidden worlds has prompted her investigations into microscopy and the nano universe – making the unseen seen. Captivated by the natural world and our mysterious, infinite universe – whether seen at macroscopic or microscopic levels – she finds them the source of endless fascination and wonder.

Mankind’s place within that universe and the dichotomy between our wish for progress and our proclivity for self-destruction, has become a central theme. A passion for frozen environments and the message they embrace, not only from the past but also for the future of our planet has resulted in research trips to the Arctic and Iceland and a detailed study of the coldest place on Earth – Antarctica. The work has qualities that reflect the intricacies of the natural world, elements that highlight its beauty and transience. Fragile, complex and esoteric, delicately balanced between risk and control, Annie’s pieces float and oscillate between absence and presence, hovering silently in a place between.

::

Annie Woodford : Website

::

01
Mar
12

Yoonjin Jung : ‘Seeing the Unseen’ Series (Mixed Media)

::

::
‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
::

::
‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2011
::

::
‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
::

::
‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
::

::
‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
::

::
‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
::

The main theme of Yoonjin’s work is ‘Seeing the Unseen’ which has been inspired by the emptiness in oriental painting. Her work explores the meaning of the empty space in oriental painting and the definition of invisibility in relation to the space. In fact some parts of her work seem unused. Yet they have been planned with as much care as the objects. What she wants to do in her work is to help the viewer to see the unseen and sense the invisible through both invisibility and visibility. Then the viewer is stimulated between the boundary of the invisibility and the visibility. – Yoonjin Jung : Artist Statement

::

Yoonjin Jung : Website

::

23
Feb
12

Sven Fennema : ‘Paris … the modern way’ (Photography)

::

::
‘Paris…the modern way’
Sven Fennema
Photograph
2011
::

::
‘Paris…the modern way’
Sven Fennema
Photograph
2011
::

::
‘Paris…the modern way’
Sven Fennema
Photograph
2011
::

::
‘Paris…the modern way’
Sven Fennema
Photograph
2011
::

::
‘Paris…the modern way’
Sven Fennema
Photograph
2011
::

::
‘Paris…the modern way’
Sven Fennema
Photograph
2011
::

“This is a set from my few days trip to Paris in spring 2011. My focus here was just on the modern side of the city, besides one, all of the pictures are taken in the hypermodern quarter “La Défense” which was very amazing for me. Although I am usually a “colour guy” I decided to go for a classic b/w conversion in this series. I hope you like my view of the city!” – Sven Fennema

::

Sven Fennema : Portfolio

::




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

email address

Join 411 other followers


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 411 other followers