Posts Tagged ‘calligraphy

02
Apr
12

Kitty Sabatier : Calligraphy

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’125′
Techniques mixtes
21 x 30 cm
2010
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’123′
Techniques mixtes
21 x 30 cm
2010
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’112′
Techniques mixtes
21 x 30 cm
2010
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’120′
Techniques mixtes
21 x 30 cm
2010
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’119′
Techniques mixtes
21 x 30 cm
2010
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’124′
Techniques mixtes
21 x 30 cm
2010
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’118′
Techniques mixtes
21 x 30 cm
2010
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Kitty Sabatier : Website

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12
Feb
12

Eve Calingaert : Artworks (Calligraphy)

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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Studied calligraphy with a Japanese master, for ten years,
who encouraged him to work the ground and in large format.

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Eve Calingaert : Galerie Faider

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08
Oct
11

Toko Shinoda : Lithographs (Prints 2)

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“The most important element is my heart, that I try to express through my body and my hands. When I take a brush in my hand, my heart searches for lines, and tries to create forms.” Toko Shinoda

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‘Tamayura’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1996

‘Simile’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1997

‘Rippling’
lithograph
15-3/4 x 11-1/4″
1983

‘Blessing’
lithograph
13-1/4 x 10-1/4″
1983

‘Snow’
lithograph
13-1/4 x 10-1/2″
1982

‘Fete’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1997

‘Maiden’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1985

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Toko zealously studied traditional calligraphy and “waka” poetry. She began teaching calligraphy, and had her first one-woman exhibition in Tokyo just before the war. During the war she tended toward abstract work, which she developed to international exhibition level over the next period. After two years’ residence in New York, in Tokyo again she turned to lithographs. She became the first female artist to collaborate with architects and with interior designers. Her versatility extended to producing textiles for theater curtains, ceramic reliefs in buildings, etchings in stainless steel for elevator decor.

[Extract : The Japan Times]

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Toko Shinoda : Castle Fine Arts

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04
Oct
11

Toko Shinoda : Lithographs (Prints)

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In an interview in the 1960s, artist Toko Shinoda said it was both wonderful and terrible to be driven by something inside. She quoted Japan’s woodblock print artist Hokusai. “I know what he meant when he said that at 75 he could understand a little. If he lived to be 90 he would understand more. And if he could live to be 120, then maybe he could understand.” Toko Shinoda

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‘Brief Note’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

‘Snow’
lithograph
15-3/4″ x 11-1/4″
1983

‘An Ode’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1988

‘Rihaku’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

‘Nocturne’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

‘Winter Green B’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

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Sometimes, in suggestions of the gentleness of her own nature, she used fragile wisps of brushes for her delicate work. Sometimes, acknowledging her certainty and inner strength, in both hands she wielded heavy mops of brushes made from special strands of sheep’s wool. Sometimes she used paper that was made by hand 300 years ago. She gave two sources for the force that drove her, “My family environment, and something in my own heart.” [Extract : The Japan Times]

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Toko Shinoda : Castle Fine Arts

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07
Jan
11

Shinichi Maruyama : “Kusho” Series (Photography)

“Silent, swift, elegant, the [actors'] actions are eminently transitive, operative, tinged with a mixture of strength and subtlety which marks the Japanese repertoire of gestures and which is a kind of aesthetic envelope, here again we come to that – exemption from meaning – that westerners can barely understand.”

Roland Barthes – The Empire of Signs (1970)

archival pigment print
shinichi maruyama
kusho series
2006

archival pigment print
shinichi maruyama
kusho series
2006

archival pigment print
shinichi maruyama
kusho series
2006

archival pigment print
shinichi maruyama
kusho series
2006

archival pigment print
shinichi maruyama
kusho series
2006

archival pigment print
shinichi maruyama
kusho series
2006

The ‘Kusho’ series consists of twenty-three large scale colour photographs that represent the interplay of black ink and water, both in midair and on white surfaces. The phenomenon that Maruyama captures of the two liquids colliding a millisecond before they merge is the result of various actions and devices. The resultant images literally deconstruct the material elements of ink drawing and calligraphy, allowing us to see in extraordinary detail the chemical and physical processes invisible to the naked eye.

[Extract : Writing in the Sky by Maurice Berger]

Shinichi Maruyama : Website




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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