Archive for September, 2011

30
Sep
11

Clifford Ross : “Hurricanes” (Photography)

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It took Clifford Ross a few years of photographing hurricanes and being dissatisfied with the results before he realized that the central drama was in the ocean. And that if he wanted to capture it, he’d have to get in it. “There’s an apocryphal tale that Turner lashed himself to a ship’s mast” says Ross describing the 19th century painter’s desire to depict stormy seas. Ross matches that devotion by getting into breakers to his neck, “I’m putting people into a position they would not normally be.”[Time]

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Clifford Ross
Hurricane VIII
50 x 60″
2000

Clifford Ross
Hurricane XV
50 x 60″
2000

Clifford Ross
Hurricane XLII
50 x 60″
2007

Clifford Ross
Hurricane II
50 x 60″
2000

Clifford Ross
Hurricane I
50 x 60″
2000

Clifford Ross
Hurricane XXV
50 x 60″
2000

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Having started out just donning a bathing suit, over the years he’s refined his equipment from waders, tightly belted at the waist, to his present set up—wetsuit, flotation vest and a rope tied to his assistant on the beach. And no, his assistant has no special lifeguard training, “I guess I have to pray that our relationship is as strong as I think it is,” Ross chuckles.

The artist, a New York City native, first became interested in photographing hurricanes in the mid-’90s, he thought he’d be chasing them all over the world. Until he realized he could just stay put on Georgica Beach, a few miles from his Long Island home. “I sit like a fisherman and wait,” says Ross who lenses eight to 12 storms per year. He doesn’t use waterproof cameras, “I don’t want anything between me and the wave,” says Ross. Despite photographing in water anywhere from his ankles to his neck, “the camera and I have both survived,” says Ross. “Its like dancers who say they leave their body during a performance. I’m so riveted by what I see, and trying to stay upright, I don’t feel any fear.”

While Ross admits to a certain amount of thrill seeking, its bearing witness to man’s negative influence on the environment that’s important to him. “Man made pollution has likely increased the intensity of droughts and hurricanes worldwide,” says Ross. He sees his photos as a warning on some level. “When hurricanes land, they force us to look at what we’re doing to nature. Did we cause some portion of this? Did we increase the intensity? The thought that we added fuel to the fire it’s appalling.” [Time]

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Clifford Ross : Website

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28
Sep
11

Kees Goudzwaard : Paintings

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‘Condense’
oil on canvas
50 x 40 cm
2011

‘Transparent Body’
oil on canvas
120 x 100 cm
2010

‘Range’
oil on canvas
80 x 100 cm
2011

‘Templet’
oil on canvas
75 x 60 cm
2011

‘Compound Lines’
oil on canvas
40 x 50 cm
2010

‘Mirage’
oil on canvas
50 x 40 cm
2010

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There is no direct reason to say this, but Kees Goudzwaard’s paintings are akin to music, covering a range that goes from the serial compositional structure to the fluidity of jazz. This innocuous, simple claim is probably related to the most intangible and imperceptible aspects of Kees Goudzwaard’s creative practice, since only remotely can the idea of composition in contemporary painting now be based on a comparison to music, which lies at the very origin of the idea of composition and was even its model from the perspective of a certain nineteenth and twentieth-century aesthetic.

In fact, music doesn’t act as an archetype, but rather as a creative system of reference for Kees painting. He starts from a set of elements which he recombines until he attains an aesthetically operative model that allows him to find a temporary solution to one of the disputes between the ancients and moderns that lasted throughout the entire twentieth century: the relationship between abstraction and figuration. In 1912, Guillaume Apollinaire established a comparison between Cubism and the history of painting, on the one hand, and between music and poetry, on the other, in order to demonstrate that the fundamental issue of modern painting was abstraction, regardless of any possible recognition of the elements that make up the painting’s composition.

Likewise, Kees Goudzwaard has found a representational system which derives from the notion of model and is simultaneously centred around a methodology based on an idea of composition and a game-like recognition of the represented. In fact, the compositional form of Goudzwaard’s paintings emerges from a score which is worked as a 1:1 scale model and subsequently transferred onto the canvas. This model is, first and foremost, a field in which Goudzwaard structures the formal question that he aims to explore: he uses sheets of coloured paper and sometimes acetate sheets (overlaid or not) attached to cardboard or to each other with masking tape.

The model, constructed through an intense combinatory process, is then painstakingly reproduced in the canvas during a second phase of the artistic process, creating a mimesis of the original model and thus establishing a perfect trompe-l’oeil effect. As in a David Mamet movie, the viewer is systematically misled. At first sight, we appear to see a painting in which the strips of tape used to create the colour fields were left in place, but we soon realise that it is merely an illusion, that it is only paint on canvas.

This elicits an abstract interpretation that in turn opens the way to the understanding that there must be a model which, albeit never shown, is the field of decision in the working process, and transforms the composition into a precise representation. The time of the gaze is thus both extended – by the interplay of recognition-illusion-recognition – and concentrated, because the long decision-making and preparation process is condensed into a single painting, the sole rendering of the path which the viewer can access. [Extract : "Map, Composition and Montage" - Delfim Sardo - published in 'Sequent']

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Kees Goudzwaard : Website

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28
Sep
11

Maxim Zhestkov : СИГНАЛ / SIGNAL (Short Film)

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Written and Directed by: Maxim Zhestkov
Sound design: Marcelo Baldin / Combustion
Editing / Compositing: Maxim Zhestkov
CG: Ilya Nikolaev / Maxim Zhestkov

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Maxim Zhestkov : Website

Maxim Zhestkov : Vimeo

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28
Sep
11

Nest : The Ultimate Horizon (Video)

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Video to the track ‘The Ultimate Horizon’ from the EP, ‘Body Pilot’ by Nest.
Video produced and edited by Alex Smalley: biglongnow
For more information visit: serein record label

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27
Sep
11

Gabriel Benaim : “Wall Art” Series (Photography)

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Untitled N#7
Silver Gelatin Print
15″ x 15″
2007

Untitled N#10
Silver Gelatin Print
15″ x 15″
2007

Untitled N#8
Silver Gelatin Print
15″ x 15″
2007

Untitled N#2
Silver Gelatin Print
15″ x 15″
2007

Untitled N#3
Silver Gelatin Print
15″ x 15″
2007

Untitled N#1
Silver Gelatin Print
15″ x 15″
2007

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Artist Statement

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I photograph in order to learn something new about what’s in front of me. The process of photographing is, for me, one of discovering visual interest in the myriad forms presented to us, and of overcoming the habits that make our perceptions grow dull. Against Duchamp, I believe in retinal art, and attempt in my work to avoid preconceptions and formulas. For me, the visual is primary, and I expect any work of art, especially my own, to stand on its own visually, without recourse to an intellectual or even conceptual scheme. Following Duchamp, I do see in the Ready-made a paradigm for how one should approach photography, in the sense that photographing creates a new version of an existing subject. The act of framing transposes a commonplace object into a work of art, if done successfully, and this transposition is for me the point of photographing. This, then, to come without preconceptions and leave with a new way of seeing, summarizes my approach to photography.

In doing this, every square inch of the photograph is important. I want the viewer of my photographs to explore the whole composition, to take in the inter-relations and tensions inherent in the view I’ve chosen. In this sense, no part is more important than any other, and where something is placed relative to the frame is more important than what it is. The edges do just as much work, if not more, as the middle, and I pay special attention to what’s placed on the edge, to the beginning and the end of the visual space. It is, in large part, this attention to the whole frame which coaxes the viewer, in turn, to navigate from one element to the next, and to then appreciate the visual relationships present.

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Gabriel Benaim : Website

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27
Sep
11

Johan Rijpma : Tegels (Video Animation)

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The hidden movements and melodies of street tiles.

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Tiles is an animation made of a large photographic collection of street tiles. By viewing this collection of photographs as a sequence, different movements and processes become visible within the frame of the tiles. Both music and animation are trying to find a balance between a thought-out arrangement and an arrangement of ‘chance’ deriving directly from the tiles.[Vimeo]

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Johan Rijpma : Vimeo

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
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